Reliability, validity, and effectiveness of center of pressure parameters in assessing stabilometric platform in subjects with incomplete spinal cord injury: A serial cross-sectional study

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Spinal cord injury (SCI) can damage long tracts, affecting postural stability. Impairments in balance have recently been proposed to be highly predictive of functional recovery in patients with SCI and thus merit evaluation. In addition to common observational clinical scales, more objective evaluation methods of balance can be implemented by analyzing center of pressure (COP) parameters using stabilometric platforms (SPs). COP analysis has been used in various pathologies, but the COP parameters with regard to measurement vary, depending on the features of the target population, and have only been assessed in healthy subjects. Specifically, concerning subjects with SCI, few studies have reported COP parameters, and none has addressed the reliability, validity, or responsiveness of this measure. The objective of this serial cross-sectional study was to analyze the reliability, validity, and responsiveness of COP parameters under various conditions in incomplete SCI subjects to assess balance. Methods. Twenty-three patients with incomplete SCI were examined 111 times for 1 year. Each session comprised administration of the Berg Balance scale, Tinetti scale, and WISCI scale and evaluation of stabilometric platform use. Stabilometry was performed under various sensory conditions (OF: open feet; CF: closed feet; OE: open eyes; CE: closed eyes), wherein several COP parameters were analyzed (L: COP path length; V: mean COP velocity, VAP: anteroposterior COP velocity; VLL: laterolateral COP velocity, A: COP ellipse area, SA1: x-axis of COP ellipse area; SA2: y-axis of COP ellipse area). The reliability, validity, and responsiveness of COP parameters that were associated with visual/support area conditions were analyzed. Results: Of the COP parameters, V and arithmetically related measures had the highest reliability, validity, and effectiveness scores. Of all test conditions, OE-OF was the most valid, whereas CE-OF was the most responsive. Conclusion: The assessment of balance in SCI subjects can be reliable, valid, and effective in acquiring V data, based on OF-OE and OF-CE conditions and heel distance values.

Original languageEnglish
Article number86
JournalJournal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 13 2014

Fingerprint

Spinal Cord Injuries
Reproducibility of Results
Cross-Sectional Studies
Pressure
Foot
Heel
Health Services Needs and Demand
Healthy Volunteers

Keywords

  • Balance
  • Center of pressure
  • Reliability
  • Spinal cord injury
  • Stabilometry
  • Validity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Health Informatics

Cite this

@article{017d2079c8114b48908cb5a8c92e06e1,
title = "Reliability, validity, and effectiveness of center of pressure parameters in assessing stabilometric platform in subjects with incomplete spinal cord injury: A serial cross-sectional study",
abstract = "Background: Spinal cord injury (SCI) can damage long tracts, affecting postural stability. Impairments in balance have recently been proposed to be highly predictive of functional recovery in patients with SCI and thus merit evaluation. In addition to common observational clinical scales, more objective evaluation methods of balance can be implemented by analyzing center of pressure (COP) parameters using stabilometric platforms (SPs). COP analysis has been used in various pathologies, but the COP parameters with regard to measurement vary, depending on the features of the target population, and have only been assessed in healthy subjects. Specifically, concerning subjects with SCI, few studies have reported COP parameters, and none has addressed the reliability, validity, or responsiveness of this measure. The objective of this serial cross-sectional study was to analyze the reliability, validity, and responsiveness of COP parameters under various conditions in incomplete SCI subjects to assess balance. Methods. Twenty-three patients with incomplete SCI were examined 111 times for 1 year. Each session comprised administration of the Berg Balance scale, Tinetti scale, and WISCI scale and evaluation of stabilometric platform use. Stabilometry was performed under various sensory conditions (OF: open feet; CF: closed feet; OE: open eyes; CE: closed eyes), wherein several COP parameters were analyzed (L: COP path length; V: mean COP velocity, VAP: anteroposterior COP velocity; VLL: laterolateral COP velocity, A: COP ellipse area, SA1: x-axis of COP ellipse area; SA2: y-axis of COP ellipse area). The reliability, validity, and responsiveness of COP parameters that were associated with visual/support area conditions were analyzed. Results: Of the COP parameters, V and arithmetically related measures had the highest reliability, validity, and effectiveness scores. Of all test conditions, OE-OF was the most valid, whereas CE-OF was the most responsive. Conclusion: The assessment of balance in SCI subjects can be reliable, valid, and effective in acquiring V data, based on OF-OE and OF-CE conditions and heel distance values.",
keywords = "Balance, Center of pressure, Reliability, Spinal cord injury, Stabilometry, Validity",
author = "Federica Tamburella and Giorgio Scivoletto and Marco Iosa and Marco Molinari",
year = "2014",
month = "5",
day = "13",
doi = "10.1186/1743-0003-11-86",
language = "English",
volume = "11",
journal = "Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation",
issn = "1743-0003",
publisher = "BioMed Central",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Reliability, validity, and effectiveness of center of pressure parameters in assessing stabilometric platform in subjects with incomplete spinal cord injury

T2 - A serial cross-sectional study

AU - Tamburella, Federica

AU - Scivoletto, Giorgio

AU - Iosa, Marco

AU - Molinari, Marco

PY - 2014/5/13

Y1 - 2014/5/13

N2 - Background: Spinal cord injury (SCI) can damage long tracts, affecting postural stability. Impairments in balance have recently been proposed to be highly predictive of functional recovery in patients with SCI and thus merit evaluation. In addition to common observational clinical scales, more objective evaluation methods of balance can be implemented by analyzing center of pressure (COP) parameters using stabilometric platforms (SPs). COP analysis has been used in various pathologies, but the COP parameters with regard to measurement vary, depending on the features of the target population, and have only been assessed in healthy subjects. Specifically, concerning subjects with SCI, few studies have reported COP parameters, and none has addressed the reliability, validity, or responsiveness of this measure. The objective of this serial cross-sectional study was to analyze the reliability, validity, and responsiveness of COP parameters under various conditions in incomplete SCI subjects to assess balance. Methods. Twenty-three patients with incomplete SCI were examined 111 times for 1 year. Each session comprised administration of the Berg Balance scale, Tinetti scale, and WISCI scale and evaluation of stabilometric platform use. Stabilometry was performed under various sensory conditions (OF: open feet; CF: closed feet; OE: open eyes; CE: closed eyes), wherein several COP parameters were analyzed (L: COP path length; V: mean COP velocity, VAP: anteroposterior COP velocity; VLL: laterolateral COP velocity, A: COP ellipse area, SA1: x-axis of COP ellipse area; SA2: y-axis of COP ellipse area). The reliability, validity, and responsiveness of COP parameters that were associated with visual/support area conditions were analyzed. Results: Of the COP parameters, V and arithmetically related measures had the highest reliability, validity, and effectiveness scores. Of all test conditions, OE-OF was the most valid, whereas CE-OF was the most responsive. Conclusion: The assessment of balance in SCI subjects can be reliable, valid, and effective in acquiring V data, based on OF-OE and OF-CE conditions and heel distance values.

AB - Background: Spinal cord injury (SCI) can damage long tracts, affecting postural stability. Impairments in balance have recently been proposed to be highly predictive of functional recovery in patients with SCI and thus merit evaluation. In addition to common observational clinical scales, more objective evaluation methods of balance can be implemented by analyzing center of pressure (COP) parameters using stabilometric platforms (SPs). COP analysis has been used in various pathologies, but the COP parameters with regard to measurement vary, depending on the features of the target population, and have only been assessed in healthy subjects. Specifically, concerning subjects with SCI, few studies have reported COP parameters, and none has addressed the reliability, validity, or responsiveness of this measure. The objective of this serial cross-sectional study was to analyze the reliability, validity, and responsiveness of COP parameters under various conditions in incomplete SCI subjects to assess balance. Methods. Twenty-three patients with incomplete SCI were examined 111 times for 1 year. Each session comprised administration of the Berg Balance scale, Tinetti scale, and WISCI scale and evaluation of stabilometric platform use. Stabilometry was performed under various sensory conditions (OF: open feet; CF: closed feet; OE: open eyes; CE: closed eyes), wherein several COP parameters were analyzed (L: COP path length; V: mean COP velocity, VAP: anteroposterior COP velocity; VLL: laterolateral COP velocity, A: COP ellipse area, SA1: x-axis of COP ellipse area; SA2: y-axis of COP ellipse area). The reliability, validity, and responsiveness of COP parameters that were associated with visual/support area conditions were analyzed. Results: Of the COP parameters, V and arithmetically related measures had the highest reliability, validity, and effectiveness scores. Of all test conditions, OE-OF was the most valid, whereas CE-OF was the most responsive. Conclusion: The assessment of balance in SCI subjects can be reliable, valid, and effective in acquiring V data, based on OF-OE and OF-CE conditions and heel distance values.

KW - Balance

KW - Center of pressure

KW - Reliability

KW - Spinal cord injury

KW - Stabilometry

KW - Validity

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84901635557&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84901635557&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1186/1743-0003-11-86

DO - 10.1186/1743-0003-11-86

M3 - Article

C2 - 24886312

AN - SCOPUS:84901635557

VL - 11

JO - Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation

JF - Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation

SN - 1743-0003

IS - 1

M1 - 86

ER -