Renal artery reconstruction for harvesting injuries in kidney transplantation with particular reference to the use of vascular allografts

Andreas G. Tzakis, Vincenzo Mazzaferro, Chen En Pan, Robert D. Gordon, Satoru Todo, Leonard Makowka, Thomas E. Starzl

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

At the University of Pittsburgh during the calendar year 1986, an arterial injury occurred during harvesting in 20 (7.5%) of the 270 grafts used to perform kidney transplantation (KTx). Four cases required reconstruction, using extension iliac arterial allografts from cadaveric donors of the same blood type; 6 patients, remodelling of the aortic patch in multiple arteries; 4 cases, repairs for injuries to the smaller segmental/polar arteries; 6 cases, a combination of the above techniques. These ex vivo arterial reconstructions are described and the use of donor arterial homografts is emphasized. No deaths have occurred at an average follow-up of 19 months. The postoperative acute tubular necrosis (ATN) rate was significantly higher (90%) compared with non-reconstructed kidneys during the same year (30%). The 1-year graft survival of kidneys undergoing arterial reconstruction (75%) was statistically no different than the overall kidneytransplant survival. Whenever extension iliac allografts were utilized, the cyclosporin-steroid immunosuppression required to control the kidney rejection contributed to the long-term patency rate of the graft. Since the number of organs available for grafting is limited, reconstruction of injured renal vessels has become justified, allowing valuable kidneys to be used that would otherwise be lost

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)80-85
Number of pages6
JournalTransplant International
Volume1
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1988

Keywords

  • Arterial injury
  • Kidney transplant
  • Renal artery reconstruction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transplantation

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