Renal denervation reduces office and ambulatory heart rate in patients with uncontrolled hypertension: 12-month outcomes fromthe global SYMPLICITY registry

Michael Böhm, Christian Ukena, Sebastian Ewen, Dominik Linz, Ina Zivanovic, Uta Hoppe, Krzysztof Narkiewicz, Luis Ruilope, Markus Schlaich, Manuela Negoita, Roland Schmieder, Bryan Williams, Uwe Zeymer, Andreas Zirlik, Giuseppe Mancia, Felix Mahfoud

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: Renal denervation (RDN) can reduce sympathetic activity and blood pressure (BP) in patients with hypertension. The effects on resting and ambulatory heart rate (HR), also regulated by the sympathetic nervous system, are not established. Methods: Herein, we report 12-month outcomes from the Global SYMPLICITY Registry on office and ambulatory HR and BP in patients with uncontrolled hypertension (n=846). Results: HR declined in correlation with the HR at baseline and at 12 months, in particular, in patients in the upper tertile of HR (>74 bpm). BP reduction was similar in the tertiles of HR at baseline. Similar effects were observed when 24-h ambulatory HR and SBP were determined. Office HR was similarly decreased when patients were on a b-blocker or not. Antihypertensive treatment remained unchanged during the 12-month period of the Global SYMPLICITY Registry. Conclusion: RDN reduces BP independent from HR. A HR reduction is dependent on baseline HR and unchanged by b-blocker treatment. The effects of RDN on SBP and HR are durable up to 1 year. HR reduction might be a target for RDN in patients with high HR at baseline, which needs to be scrutinized in prospective trials.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2480-2486
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Hypertension
Volume34
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Keywords

  • Renal denervation
  • Resting heart rate
  • SBP
  • Sympathetic nervous system
  • Uncontrolled hypertension

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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