Repair of abasic sites by mammalian cell extracts

G. Frosina, P. Fortini, O. Rossi, F. Carrozzino, A. Abbondandolo, E. Dogliotti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hamster cell extracts that perform repair synthesis on covalently closed circular DNA containing pyrimidine dimers, were used to study the repair of apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites and methoxyamine (MX)-modified AP sites. Plasmid molecules were heat-treated at pH 5 and incubated with MX when required. The amount of damage introduced ranged from 0.2 to 0.9 AP sites/kb. Extracts were prepared from the Chinese hamster ovary CHO-9 cell line and from its derivative, 43-3B clone which is mutated in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) ERCC1 gene. AP and MX-AP sites stimulated repair synthesis by CHO-9 cell extracts. The level of synthesis correlated with the number of lesions and was of similar magnitude to the repair stimulated by 4.3 u.v. photoproducts/kb. Repair of AP and MX-AP sites was faster than the repair of u.v. damage and was independent of ERCC1 gene product. The high level of repair replication was due to a very efficient and rapid incision of plasmids carrying AP or MX-AP sites, performed by abundant AP endonucleases present in the extract. The calculated average repair patch sizes were: 7 nucleotides per AP site; 10 nucleotides per MX-AP site; 28 nucleotides per (6-4) u.v. photoproduct or cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer. The data indicate that AP and MX-AP sites are very efficiently repaired by base-excision repair in mammalian cells and suggest that MX-AP sites may also be processed via alternative repair mechanisms.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)699-705
Number of pages7
JournalBiochemical Journal
Volume304
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 1994

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Cell Extracts
Repair
Cells
Pyrimidine Dimers
Nucleotides
CHO Cells
DNA Repair
Plasmids
Circular DNA
methoxyamine
Endonucleases
Genes
Cricetulus
Cricetinae
Ovary
Clone Cells
Hot Temperature
Cell Line
Derivatives
Molecules

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Frosina, G., Fortini, P., Rossi, O., Carrozzino, F., Abbondandolo, A., & Dogliotti, E. (1994). Repair of abasic sites by mammalian cell extracts. Biochemical Journal, 304(3), 699-705.

Repair of abasic sites by mammalian cell extracts. / Frosina, G.; Fortini, P.; Rossi, O.; Carrozzino, F.; Abbondandolo, A.; Dogliotti, E.

In: Biochemical Journal, Vol. 304, No. 3, 1994, p. 699-705.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Frosina, G, Fortini, P, Rossi, O, Carrozzino, F, Abbondandolo, A & Dogliotti, E 1994, 'Repair of abasic sites by mammalian cell extracts', Biochemical Journal, vol. 304, no. 3, pp. 699-705.
Frosina G, Fortini P, Rossi O, Carrozzino F, Abbondandolo A, Dogliotti E. Repair of abasic sites by mammalian cell extracts. Biochemical Journal. 1994;304(3):699-705.
Frosina, G. ; Fortini, P. ; Rossi, O. ; Carrozzino, F. ; Abbondandolo, A. ; Dogliotti, E. / Repair of abasic sites by mammalian cell extracts. In: Biochemical Journal. 1994 ; Vol. 304, No. 3. pp. 699-705.
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