Repeated Surgical or Endoscopic Myotomy for Recurrent Dysphagia in Patients After Previous Myotomy for Achalasia

Uberto Fumagalli, Riccardo Rosati, Stefano De Pascale, Matteo Porta, Elisa Carlani, Alessandra Pestalozza, Alessandro Repici

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aim: Surgical myotomy of the lower esophageal sphincter has a 5-year success rate of approximately 91 %. Peroral endoscopic myotomy can provide similar results for controlling dysphagia. Some patients experience either persistent or recurrent dysphagia after myotomy. We present here a retrospective analysis of our experience with redo myotomy for recurrent dysphagia in patients with achalasia. Methods: From March 1996 to February 2015, 234 myotomies for primary or recurrent achalasia were performed in our center. Fifteen patients (6.4 %) had had a previous myotomy and were undergoing surgical redo myotomy (n = 9) or endoscopic redo myotomy (n = 6) for recurrent symptoms. Results: Patients presented at a median of 10.4 months after previous myotomy. Median preoperative Eckardt score was 6. Among the nine patients undergoing surgical myotomy, three esophageal perforations occurred intraoperatively (all repaired immediately). Surgery lasted 111 and 62 min on average (median) in the surgical and peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) groups, respectively. No postoperative complications occurred in either group. Median postoperative stay was 3 and 2.5 days in the surgical and POEM groups, respectively. In the surgical group, Eckardt score was
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)494 - 499
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Gastrointestinal Surgery
Volume20
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1 2016

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Esophageal Achalasia
Deglutition Disorders
Esophageal Perforation
Lower Esophageal Sphincter

Keywords

  • Achalasia
  • Dysphagia
  • Laparoscopic myotomy
  • Peroral endoscopic myotomy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Repeated Surgical or Endoscopic Myotomy for Recurrent Dysphagia in Patients After Previous Myotomy for Achalasia. / Fumagalli, Uberto; Rosati, Riccardo; De Pascale, Stefano; Porta, Matteo; Carlani, Elisa; Pestalozza, Alessandra; Repici, Alessandro.

In: Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Vol. 20, No. 3, 01.03.2016, p. 494 - 499.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Aim: Surgical myotomy of the lower esophageal sphincter has a 5-year success rate of approximately 91 {\%}. Peroral endoscopic myotomy can provide similar results for controlling dysphagia. Some patients experience either persistent or recurrent dysphagia after myotomy. We present here a retrospective analysis of our experience with redo myotomy for recurrent dysphagia in patients with achalasia. Methods: From March 1996 to February 2015, 234 myotomies for primary or recurrent achalasia were performed in our center. Fifteen patients (6.4 {\%}) had had a previous myotomy and were undergoing surgical redo myotomy (n = 9) or endoscopic redo myotomy (n = 6) for recurrent symptoms. Results: Patients presented at a median of 10.4 months after previous myotomy. Median preoperative Eckardt score was 6. Among the nine patients undergoing surgical myotomy, three esophageal perforations occurred intraoperatively (all repaired immediately). Surgery lasted 111 and 62 min on average (median) in the surgical and peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) groups, respectively. No postoperative complications occurred in either group. Median postoperative stay was 3 and 2.5 days in the surgical and POEM groups, respectively. In the surgical group, Eckardt score was",
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AU - Carlani, Elisa

AU - Pestalozza, Alessandra

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