Repeated virus identification in the airways of patients with mild and severe asthma during prospective follow-up

V. Turchiarelli, J. Schinkel, R. Molenkamp, M. P. Foschino Barbaro, G. E. Carpagnano, A. Spanevello, R. Lutter, E. H. Bel, P. J. Sterk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Respiratory viruses may persist in the airways of asthmatics between episodes of clinical worsening. We hypothesized that patients with clinically stable, severe asthma exhibit increased and more prolonged viral presence in the airways as compared to mild asthmatics and healthy controls. Methods: Thirty-five subjects (no cold symptoms >4 weeks) entered a 12-week prospective study using three groups: clinically stable mild asthma (GINA 2) (n = 12, age 34.1 ± 13.4 year), severe asthma (GINA 4) (n = 12, age 49.3 ± 14.8 year) and healthy controls (n = 11, age 37.9 ± 14.2 year). All subjects underwent spirometry and completed a written questionnaire on asthma symptoms at baseline. Nasal and throat swabs, induced sputum samples, exhaled breath condensate and gelatine-filtered expired air were analysed at 0, 6 and 12 weeks by a multiplex real-time PCR assay for 14 respiratory viruses using adequate positive and negative controls. Results: Thirty-two of 525 patient assessments (6%) showed a virus-positive sample. Among the 14 respiratory viruses examined, HRV, adenovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza 3&4, human bocavirus, influenza B and coronavirus were detected. When combining all sampling methods, on average 18% of controls and 30% of mild and severe asthmatics were virus positive, which was not different between the groups (P = 0.34). The longitudinal data showed a changing rather than persistent viral presence over time. Conclusion: Patients with clinically stable asthma and healthy controls have similar detection rates of respiratory viruses in samples from nasopharynx, sputum and exhaled air. This indicates that viral presence in the airways of stable (severe) asthmatics varies over time rather than being persistent.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1099-1106
Number of pages8
JournalAllergy: European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Volume66
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2011

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Asthma
Viruses
Sputum
Human bocavirus
Air
Paramyxoviridae Infections
Coronavirus
Respiratory Syncytial Viruses
Nasopharynx
Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction
Spirometry
Respiratory Rate
Pharynx
Nose
Adenoviridae
Human Influenza
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Prospective Studies

Keywords

  • diagnosis
  • latent viral infection
  • noninvasive sampling
  • persistent viral infection
  • rhinovirus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

Repeated virus identification in the airways of patients with mild and severe asthma during prospective follow-up. / Turchiarelli, V.; Schinkel, J.; Molenkamp, R.; Foschino Barbaro, M. P.; Carpagnano, G. E.; Spanevello, A.; Lutter, R.; Bel, E. H.; Sterk, P. J.

In: Allergy: European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Vol. 66, No. 8, 08.2011, p. 1099-1106.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Turchiarelli, V. ; Schinkel, J. ; Molenkamp, R. ; Foschino Barbaro, M. P. ; Carpagnano, G. E. ; Spanevello, A. ; Lutter, R. ; Bel, E. H. ; Sterk, P. J. / Repeated virus identification in the airways of patients with mild and severe asthma during prospective follow-up. In: Allergy: European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. 2011 ; Vol. 66, No. 8. pp. 1099-1106.
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abstract = "Background: Respiratory viruses may persist in the airways of asthmatics between episodes of clinical worsening. We hypothesized that patients with clinically stable, severe asthma exhibit increased and more prolonged viral presence in the airways as compared to mild asthmatics and healthy controls. Methods: Thirty-five subjects (no cold symptoms >4 weeks) entered a 12-week prospective study using three groups: clinically stable mild asthma (GINA 2) (n = 12, age 34.1 ± 13.4 year), severe asthma (GINA 4) (n = 12, age 49.3 ± 14.8 year) and healthy controls (n = 11, age 37.9 ± 14.2 year). All subjects underwent spirometry and completed a written questionnaire on asthma symptoms at baseline. Nasal and throat swabs, induced sputum samples, exhaled breath condensate and gelatine-filtered expired air were analysed at 0, 6 and 12 weeks by a multiplex real-time PCR assay for 14 respiratory viruses using adequate positive and negative controls. Results: Thirty-two of 525 patient assessments (6{\%}) showed a virus-positive sample. Among the 14 respiratory viruses examined, HRV, adenovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza 3&4, human bocavirus, influenza B and coronavirus were detected. When combining all sampling methods, on average 18{\%} of controls and 30{\%} of mild and severe asthmatics were virus positive, which was not different between the groups (P = 0.34). The longitudinal data showed a changing rather than persistent viral presence over time. Conclusion: Patients with clinically stable asthma and healthy controls have similar detection rates of respiratory viruses in samples from nasopharynx, sputum and exhaled air. This indicates that viral presence in the airways of stable (severe) asthmatics varies over time rather than being persistent.",
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AU - Carpagnano, G. E.

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