Replication and tropism of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 as predictors of disease outcome in infants with vertically acquired infection

Anita De Rossi, Carlo Giaquinto, Lucia Ometto, Fabrizio Mammano, Carlo Zanotto, David Dunn, Luigi Chieco-Bianchi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In a series of 97 infants born to mothers who were seropositive for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), 18 were identified as infected within the first 60 days of life on the basis of viral culture and polymerase chain reaction findings. We studied viral burden in vivo by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and the in vitro replication pattern of the HIV-1 infecting strain by culturing patient cells with normal phytohemagglutinin-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells. According to the lag phase before p24 antigen detection and the level of p24 production on peripheral blood mononuclear cells, HIV-1 isolates from these patients were classified as rapid/high (R/H), slow/high (S/H), and slow/low (S/L). The pattern of HIV-1 replication in vitro was significantly associated with the viral burden in vivo; the range of HIV-1 copies per 105 peripheral blood mononuclear cells was 10 to 38, 44 to 314, and 360 to 947 in children with isolates of the S/L, S/H, and R/H types, respectively. Viral tropism was assessed by culturing patient cells under end-point dilution conditions with either CD4+ T-lymphocytes or monocyte-derived macrophages. We found that children with S/L isolates harbored mainly monocytotropic variants; all infants with S/H or R/H isolates had T-lymphotropic variants and, in 7 of 11 cases, monocytotropic or amphitropic variants. All children with R/H isolates had HIV-related symptoms by the age of 4 months, and five had acquired immunodeficiency syndrome by the age of 1 year. At 1 year of age, four and no infants with S/H or S/L isolates, respectively, had HIV-1-related symptoms (p

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)929-936
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Pediatrics
Volume123
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1993

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Tropism
HIV-1
Infection
Blood Cells
Viral Load
Viral Tropism
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Phytohemagglutinins
Virus Replication
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Macrophages
Mothers
HIV
T-Lymphocytes
Antigens

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Replication and tropism of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 as predictors of disease outcome in infants with vertically acquired infection. / De Rossi, Anita; Giaquinto, Carlo; Ometto, Lucia; Mammano, Fabrizio; Zanotto, Carlo; Dunn, David; Chieco-Bianchi, Luigi.

In: Journal of Pediatrics, Vol. 123, No. 6, 1993, p. 929-936.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

De Rossi, Anita ; Giaquinto, Carlo ; Ometto, Lucia ; Mammano, Fabrizio ; Zanotto, Carlo ; Dunn, David ; Chieco-Bianchi, Luigi. / Replication and tropism of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 as predictors of disease outcome in infants with vertically acquired infection. In: Journal of Pediatrics. 1993 ; Vol. 123, No. 6. pp. 929-936.
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