Report of two cases of quintuple primary malignancies and review of the literature

Maria Cecilia Cercato, Elvira Colella, Virginia Ferraresi, Maria Grazia Diodoro, Riccardo Tonachella

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Multiple primary malignant neoplasms (MPMN) are not uncommon, however, finding more than three primary malignancies in one individual is unusual. Surviving five malignancies is considered exceptional. Two patients surviving five primary malignant neoplasms for 12 and 18 years are reported: a 55-year-old woman with a squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx, two carcinomas of the breast, a carcinoma of the kidney and an adenocarcinoma of the colon, and a 75-year-old woman with a sarcoma of the myometrium, a carcinoma of the thyroid, an adenocarcinoma of the rectum, a leiomyosarcoma of the colon and a bronchial carcinoid. Only twelve other reported cases with five or more primary infiltrating malignancies involving more than three sites, diagnosed while the patient was alive have been found. Relevant features were that colon cancer was quite often present more than once and survival was longer than expected for the stage (median overall survival, 20 years; 95% confidence interval: 12-28years).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2953-2958
Number of pages6
JournalAnticancer Research
Volume28
Issue number5 B
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2008

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Keywords

  • Multiple primary
  • Neoplasm
  • Second primary

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

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