Resting and postexercise hemodynamic effects of carvedilol, a β-adrenergic blocker and precapillary vasodilator in hypertensive patients

G. Leonetti, L. Sampieri, C. Cuspidi, L. Boselli, L. Terzoli, L. Rupoli, A. Zanchetti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Carvedilol is a recently developed antihypertensive drug that combines in the same molecule a nonselective β-adrenoceptor blocking effect and a vasodilating precapillary activity. In our study, we have investigated the effects of carvedilol 25 mg b.i.d. on blood pressure, heart rate, and plasma noradrenaline in hypertensive patients at rest and during exercise after acute and repeated oral administration for 7 days. The daily average supine blood pressure of the 12 patients with essential hypertension was 178 ± 10/107 ± 3 mm Hg (means ± SD of 8 measurements in each patient) after placebo and was significantly (p <0.01) reduced to 162 ± 17/99 ± 8 mm Hg on the first day and to 158 ± 15/96 ± 8 mm Hg on the seventh day of carvedilol treatment. Similar values were found in the upright posture. Heart rate was slightly but significantly lowered during acute and repeated administration. The exercise-induced increase in systolic blood pressure was significantly reduced by carvedilol 25 mg b.i.d., while there was a nonsignificant reduction in the tachycardie response. There was a significantly greater rise in plasma noradrenaline during exercise on the seventh day of carvedilol treatment. Carvedilol significantly lowered blood pressure and heart rate at rest and the exercise-induced rise in systolic blood pressure.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)S94-S96
JournalJournal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology
Volume10
Publication statusPublished - 1987

Keywords

  • Antihypertensive treatment
  • Carvedilol
  • Dynamic exercise
  • Plasma noradrenaline

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Pharmacology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Resting and postexercise hemodynamic effects of carvedilol, a β-adrenergic blocker and precapillary vasodilator in hypertensive patients'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this