Resting heart rate is associated with renal disease outcomes in patients with vascular disease: Results of the ONTARGET and TRANSCEND studies

Michael Böhm, H. Schumacher, R. E. Schmieder, J. F E Mann, K. Teo, E. Lonn, P. Sleight, G. Mancia, D. Linz, F. Mahfoud, C. Ukena, K. Sliwa, G. Bakris, S. Yusuf

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Resting heart rate (RHR) is associated with cardiovascular disease outcomes in high-risk patients. It is not known whether RHR is predictive of renal outcomes such as albuminuria, end-stage renal disease (ESRD) or doubling of creatinine. We evaluated whether RHR could predict renal endpoints in patients at a high risk of cardiovascular disease. We also tested the effects of RHR at different levels of systolic blood pressure (SBP). Methods: We analysed data from 28 757 patients in the ONTARGET and TRANSCEND trials. RHR and SBP were available for a mean of 4.9 ± 0.4 visits (range 3-5) within the first 2 years of the studies. Albuminuria was determined at baseline, at 2 years and at study end. Results: Mean RHR was predictive of incident micro-albuminuria [hazard ratio (HR) for RHR ≥80 vs. -1 1.49, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.29-1.71, P <0.0001], incident macro-albuminuria (HR 1.84, 95% CI 1.39-2.42, P <0.0001), doubling of creatinine (HR 1.47, 95% CI 1.00-2.17, P = 0.050) and ESRD (HR 1.78, 95% CI 1.00-3.16, P = 0.050), and the combined renal end-point (HR 1.51, 95% CI 1.32-1.74, P <0.0001). Associations were robust at SBPs from

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)38-49
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Internal Medicine
Volume278
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1 2015

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular prevention
  • Heart rate
  • High cardiovascular disease risk
  • Hypertension
  • Renal function

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Medicine(all)

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