Resting state fMRI in Alzheimer's disease: Beyond the default mode network

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Using resting state (RS) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), the connectivity patterns of the default mode (DMN), frontoparietal, executive, and salience networks were explored in 13 Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, 12 amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) patients, and 13 healthy controls. Compared with controls and aMCI, AD was associated with opposing connectivity effects in the DMN (decreased) and frontal networks (enhanced). The only RS abnormality found in aMCI patients compared with controls was a precuneus connectivity reduction in the DMN. RS fMRI group differences were only partly related to gray matter atrophy. In AD patients, the mean executive network connectivity was positively associated with frontal-executive and language neuropsychological scores. These results suggest that AD is associated with an alteration of large-scale functional brain networks, which extends well beyond the DMN. In AD, the limited resources of the DMN may be paralleled, in an attempt to maintain cognitive efficiency, by an increased prefrontal connectivity. A medial parietal RS fMRI signal change seems to be present since the early phase of AD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1564-1578
Number of pages15
JournalNeurobiology of Aging
Volume33
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2012

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Functional MRI (fMRI)
  • Mild cognitive impairment
  • Resting state fMRI

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Ageing
  • Developmental Biology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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