Retrospective comparison of long-term ten-day/month rifaximin or mesalazine in prevention of relapse in acute diverticulitis

V. Festa, S. Spila Alegiani, F. Chiesara, A. Moretti, M. Bianchi, A. Dezi, G. Traversa, M. Koch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Diverticular disease (DD) of the colon has an increasing burden on health services. The effectiveness of rifaximin for the treatment of DD, is not yet established. The aim of this study is to assess the impact of long-term treatment with rifaximin or mesalazine in a 10-day schedule for the prevention of recurrent diverticulitis.

PATIENTS AND METHODS: This is a retrospective study. We identified all consecutive patients with DD and previous acute diverticulitis (AD) in our outpatients' database; 124 patients, were included. The recommended therapy consisted of a ten-day/month treatment with either rifaximin (400 mg bid), or mesalazine (2.4 g/daily). Primary end point was AD recurrence.

RESULTS: Between 2010 and 2014, 72 patients were treated with rifaximin and 52 with mesalazine. During a median follow-up of 15 months (range 1-50), we observed 21 episodes of AD among users of either rifaximin (n=7; 0.54 per 100 person-months), or mesalazine group (n=14; 1.46 per 100 person-months). Kaplan-Meier survival estimates of recurrent AD significantly differed between rifaximin and mesalazine groups (p=0.015). The multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that AD recurrence was significantly associated with therapy (rifaximin vs. mesalazine, adjusted HR 0.27; 95% CI: 0.10 to 0.72), age and gender.

CONCLUSIONS: Long-term treatment with rifaximin in a 10-day schedule appears more effective than mesalazine in preventing recurrent AD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1397-1404
Number of pages8
JournalEuropean Review for Medical and Pharmacological Sciences
Volume21
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1 2017

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rifaximin
Mesalamine
Diverticulitis
Secondary Prevention
Appointments and Schedules
Therapeutics
Recurrence
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Acute Disease
Health Services
Colon
Outpatients
Retrospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Databases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Retrospective comparison of long-term ten-day/month rifaximin or mesalazine in prevention of relapse in acute diverticulitis. / Festa, V.; Spila Alegiani, S.; Chiesara, F.; Moretti, A.; Bianchi, M.; Dezi, A.; Traversa, G.; Koch, M.

In: European Review for Medical and Pharmacological Sciences, Vol. 21, No. 6, 01.03.2017, p. 1397-1404.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "OBJECTIVE: Diverticular disease (DD) of the colon has an increasing burden on health services. The effectiveness of rifaximin for the treatment of DD, is not yet established. The aim of this study is to assess the impact of long-term treatment with rifaximin or mesalazine in a 10-day schedule for the prevention of recurrent diverticulitis.PATIENTS AND METHODS: This is a retrospective study. We identified all consecutive patients with DD and previous acute diverticulitis (AD) in our outpatients' database; 124 patients, were included. The recommended therapy consisted of a ten-day/month treatment with either rifaximin (400 mg bid), or mesalazine (2.4 g/daily). Primary end point was AD recurrence.RESULTS: Between 2010 and 2014, 72 patients were treated with rifaximin and 52 with mesalazine. During a median follow-up of 15 months (range 1-50), we observed 21 episodes of AD among users of either rifaximin (n=7; 0.54 per 100 person-months), or mesalazine group (n=14; 1.46 per 100 person-months). Kaplan-Meier survival estimates of recurrent AD significantly differed between rifaximin and mesalazine groups (p=0.015). The multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that AD recurrence was significantly associated with therapy (rifaximin vs. mesalazine, adjusted HR 0.27; 95{\%} CI: 0.10 to 0.72), age and gender.CONCLUSIONS: Long-term treatment with rifaximin in a 10-day schedule appears more effective than mesalazine in preventing recurrent AD.",
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AU - Traversa, G.

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