Reverse redistribution of thallium-201 heralding the development of myocardial infarction: Description of two cases

G. Fragasso, S. L. Chierchia, G. Pizzetti, F. Dosio, F. Fazio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Development of a perfusion defect on the 201Tl image from exercise to redistribution is referred to as reverse redistribution, a finding which has been previously associated with several conditions. We describe here two cases in which the reverse-redistribution phenomenon, observed in a routine stress-redistribution thallium-201 scan performed because of chest pain, was considered to be artifactual. Both patients subsequently developed a myocardial infarction in the areas showing the delayed perfusion defect. The potential clinical significance of the reverse-redistribution phenomenon in these two cases is discussed. When observed in patients with typical anginal pain, the reverse redistribution pattern should be considered a potential marker of tissue at risk in a region with previous, otherwise undetected, subendocardial infarction. In such patients the need for coronary angiography should be carefully considered.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)514-517
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of nuclear biology and medicine (Turin, Italy : 1991)
Volume38
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 1994

Fingerprint

Thallium
Myocardial Infarction
Perfusion
Coronary Angiography
Chest Pain
Infarction
Exercise
Pain

Keywords

  • Angina pectoris
  • Myocardial infarction
  • Reverse redistribution
  • Thallium-201
  • Viability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Reverse redistribution of thallium-201 heralding the development of myocardial infarction : Description of two cases. / Fragasso, G.; Chierchia, S. L.; Pizzetti, G.; Dosio, F.; Fazio, F.

In: Journal of nuclear biology and medicine (Turin, Italy : 1991), Vol. 38, No. 3, 1994, p. 514-517.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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