Reversible operculum syndrome caused by progressive epilepsia partialis continua in a child with left hemimegalencephaly

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Abstract

In a child with left hemimegalencephaly and seizures, a reversible operculum syndrome developed when continuous epileptic discharges spread from the left hemisphere to the contralateral central regions. The operculum syndrome lasted for three months until left hemispherectomy was performed. Soon after surgery the seizures and the operculum syndrome resolved. The operculum syndrome is a facio-pharyngo-glosso-masticatory diplegia usually due to structural lesions in both opercular regions. The reversibility of the syndrome in the reported case demonstrates that the operculum syndrome is sometimes functional rather than lesional.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)556-558
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry
Volume54
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - 1991

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Epilepsia Partialis Continua
Seizures
Hemispherectomy
Hemimegalencephaly

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

Cite this

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title = "Reversible operculum syndrome caused by progressive epilepsia partialis continua in a child with left hemimegalencephaly",
abstract = "In a child with left hemimegalencephaly and seizures, a reversible operculum syndrome developed when continuous epileptic discharges spread from the left hemisphere to the contralateral central regions. The operculum syndrome lasted for three months until left hemispherectomy was performed. Soon after surgery the seizures and the operculum syndrome resolved. The operculum syndrome is a facio-pharyngo-glosso-masticatory diplegia usually due to structural lesions in both opercular regions. The reversibility of the syndrome in the reported case demonstrates that the operculum syndrome is sometimes functional rather than lesional.",
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N2 - In a child with left hemimegalencephaly and seizures, a reversible operculum syndrome developed when continuous epileptic discharges spread from the left hemisphere to the contralateral central regions. The operculum syndrome lasted for three months until left hemispherectomy was performed. Soon after surgery the seizures and the operculum syndrome resolved. The operculum syndrome is a facio-pharyngo-glosso-masticatory diplegia usually due to structural lesions in both opercular regions. The reversibility of the syndrome in the reported case demonstrates that the operculum syndrome is sometimes functional rather than lesional.

AB - In a child with left hemimegalencephaly and seizures, a reversible operculum syndrome developed when continuous epileptic discharges spread from the left hemisphere to the contralateral central regions. The operculum syndrome lasted for three months until left hemispherectomy was performed. Soon after surgery the seizures and the operculum syndrome resolved. The operculum syndrome is a facio-pharyngo-glosso-masticatory diplegia usually due to structural lesions in both opercular regions. The reversibility of the syndrome in the reported case demonstrates that the operculum syndrome is sometimes functional rather than lesional.

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