Rickettsia buchneri, symbiont of the deer tick Ixodes scapularis, can colonise the salivary glands of its host

Alaa M. Al-Khafaji, Stuart D. Armstrong, Ilaria Varotto Boccazzi, Stefano Gaiarsa, Amit Sinha, Zhiru Li, Davide Sassera, Clotilde K.S. Carlow, Sara Epis, Benjamin L. Makepeace

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Vertically-transmitted bacterial symbionts are widespread in ticks and have manifold impacts on the epidemiology of tick-borne diseases. For instance, they may provide essential nutrients to ticks, affect vector competence, induce immune responses in vertebrate hosts, or even evolve to become vertebrate pathogens. The deer or blacklegged tick Ixodes scapularis harbours the symbiont Rickettsia buchneri in its ovarian tissues. Here we show by molecular, proteomic and imaging methods that R. buchneri is also capable of colonising the salivary glands of wild I. scapularis. This finding has important implications for the diagnosis of rickettsial infections and for pathogen-symbiont interactions in this notorious vector of Lyme borreliosis.

Original languageEnglish
Article number101299
JournalTicks and Tick-borne Diseases
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Rickettsia
Ixodes
Ixodes scapularis
Ticks
salivary glands
Salivary Glands
symbionts
Vertebrates
Tick-Borne Diseases
ticks
Molecular Imaging
Deer
Lyme Disease
rickettsial diseases
vertebrates
tick-borne diseases
vector competence
Proteomics
Mental Competency
Lyme disease

Keywords

  • Biotin synthesis
  • Midichloria
  • Rickettsiosis
  • Symbiosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Microbiology
  • Insect Science
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Al-Khafaji, A. M., Armstrong, S. D., Varotto Boccazzi, I., Gaiarsa, S., Sinha, A., Li, Z., ... Makepeace, B. L. (Accepted/In press). Rickettsia buchneri, symbiont of the deer tick Ixodes scapularis, can colonise the salivary glands of its host. Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases, [101299]. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ttbdis.2019.101299

Rickettsia buchneri, symbiont of the deer tick Ixodes scapularis, can colonise the salivary glands of its host. / Al-Khafaji, Alaa M.; Armstrong, Stuart D.; Varotto Boccazzi, Ilaria; Gaiarsa, Stefano; Sinha, Amit; Li, Zhiru; Sassera, Davide; Carlow, Clotilde K.S.; Epis, Sara; Makepeace, Benjamin L.

In: Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Al-Khafaji, AM, Armstrong, SD, Varotto Boccazzi, I, Gaiarsa, S, Sinha, A, Li, Z, Sassera, D, Carlow, CKS, Epis, S & Makepeace, BL 2019, 'Rickettsia buchneri, symbiont of the deer tick Ixodes scapularis, can colonise the salivary glands of its host', Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ttbdis.2019.101299
Al-Khafaji, Alaa M. ; Armstrong, Stuart D. ; Varotto Boccazzi, Ilaria ; Gaiarsa, Stefano ; Sinha, Amit ; Li, Zhiru ; Sassera, Davide ; Carlow, Clotilde K.S. ; Epis, Sara ; Makepeace, Benjamin L. / Rickettsia buchneri, symbiont of the deer tick Ixodes scapularis, can colonise the salivary glands of its host. In: Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases. 2019.
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