RISC RNA sequencing in the Dorsal Raphè reveals microRNAs regulatory activities associated with behavioral and functional adaptations to chronic stress

Lucy Babicola, Marco Pietrosanto, Donald Ielpo, Sebastian Luca D'Addario, Simona Cabib, Rossella Ventura, Fabio Ferlazzo, Manuela Helmer-Citterich, Diego Andolina, Luisa Lo Iacono

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The Dorsal Raphe (DR) is the primary source of serotonergic input in the brain and a center for the homeostatic maintenance of the serotonergic tone. Under repeated stimulation, it can undergo adaptive modifications that alter serotonergic neurotransmission, which can lead to behavioral dysfunction. Post-transcriptional regulation by microRNAs is implicated in these adaptations. However, a global microRNA/target network effect on the DR neuroplasticity has yet to be elucidated. Here we investigate the microRNAs/mRNAs regulatory activity in the mouse DR after a chronic stress experience. First, we assessed the behavioral consequences of repeated restraint stress exposure and the functional adaptations of the DR by measuring the change in acute stress-induced serotonin release. Then, through next generation RNA-Seq of Argonaute2-bound RNA (RISC-Seq) we identified microRNAs and their targets that are associated to the RISC complex of the DR in unstressed and stressed mice. We mapped the potential microRNA/mRNA network within the stress-altered transcripts, uncovering new interactions that contribute to the chronic stress-induced DR modifications.

Original languageEnglish
Article number146763
JournalBrain Research
Volume1736
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2020

Keywords

  • Chronic stress
  • Dorsal Raphe
  • MicroRNA regulatory activity
  • Research Domain Criteria
  • RISC sequencing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Molecular Biology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Developmental Biology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'RISC RNA sequencing in the Dorsal Raphè reveals microRNAs regulatory activities associated with behavioral and functional adaptations to chronic stress'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this