Risk factors for high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia in patients with mild cytological dyskaryosis: Human papillomavirus testing versus multivariate tree analysis of demographic data

Mario Sideri, Laura Spinaci, Francesco Schettino, Maura Mezzetti, Chris Robertson, Noemi Spolti, Raffaella Di Pace, Piergiorgio Crosignani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The objective of this study was to compare the use of molecular hybridization by hybrid capture methodology for human papillomavirus (HPV) with the use of demographic and lifestyle variables as intermediate triage in patients with cytological mild dyskaryosis. The study was designed as a prospective study using regression tree analysis of demographic data in consecutive patients who were subjected to colposcopic evaluation at the colposcopy clinic at the First Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Milan (Milan, Italy). A total of 177 women were subjected to colposcopy because of a single routine Pap smear showing mild dyskaryosis. A structured interview, sampling for HPV testing for the detection of viral DNA by hybrid capture methodology, and colposcopic evaluation with cervical biopsies were performed for each subject. The accuracies of molecular hybridization for HPV and of the classification model based on the demographic and lifestyle variables in predicting patients with histologically high-grade cervical intraepithelial lesions were measured. The classification model based on the demographic and lifestyle variables showed comparable results with molecular hybridization for HPV (specificity, 0.75 versus 0.73; sensitivity, 0.61 versus 0.67, respectively). The use of demographic and lifestyle variables appears to be a simple and economic possibility for triaging patients with mild dyskaryotic smears in a screening program.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)237-241
Number of pages5
JournalCancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention
Volume7
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1998

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology

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