Risk factors in schoolchildren associated with a family history of unheralded myocardial infarction or uncomplicated stable angina in male relatives

Filippo Crea, Achille Gaspardone, Fabrizio Tomai, Carol Shoulders, Anna De Fazio, Francesco Versaci, Maria Iamele, Carla Roncaglioni, Maria Gioffré, Attilio Maseri, Pier A. Gioffré

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives. The aim of this study was to compare risk factors for coronary atherosclerosis in children with a family history of unheralded myocardial infarction or uncomplicated stable angina. Background. In patients with unheralded myocardial infarction, coronary atherosclerosis might have a greater tendency to cause acute coronary occlusion than in patients with uncomplicated stable angina, suggesting the possibility of different risk factors in these two groups of patients. Methods. Serum lipid levels were compared in children with a family history of unheralded myocardial infarction (236 children) or uncomplicated stable angina (48 children) or no family history of ischemic heart disease (613 children). Results. Mean (± 1 SD) total serum cholesterol was higher in children with a family history of myocardial infarction than in control subjects (161 ± 28 vs. 154 ± 25 mg%, p <0.01). In children with a family history of stable angina, mean total serum cholesterol (159 ± 25 mg%) was similar to that in children with family history of myocardial infarction. High density lipoprotein cholesterol and apolipoprotein A-I were higher in children with family history of stable angina than in children with family history of myocardial infarction and control subjects (69 ± 18 vs. 61 ± 13 and 60 ± 13 mg%, p <0.01; 143 ± 23 vs. 130 ± 18 and 129 ± 18 mg%, p <0.01, respectively). in children with a family history of myocardial infarction, the low density/high density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio was significantly higher than in control subjects (1.53 ± 0.64 vs. 1.44 ± 0.56, p <0.05). Conversely, in children with a family history of stable angina, this ratio (1.24 ± 0.51) was significantly lower (p <0.05) than in control subjects. Conclusions. Risk factors for coronary athersclerosis in children with a family history of unheralded myocardial infraction are different from those in children with a family history of uncomplicated stable angina. Higher levels of apolipoprotein A-I early in life might reduce the risk of acute coronary syndromes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1472-1478
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American College of Cardiology
Volume23
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1994

Fingerprint

Stable Angina
Myocardial Infarction
Apolipoprotein A-I
HDL Cholesterol
Coronary Artery Disease
Serum
Cholesterol
Coronary Occlusion
Acute Coronary Syndrome
Myocardial Ischemia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Risk factors in schoolchildren associated with a family history of unheralded myocardial infarction or uncomplicated stable angina in male relatives. / Crea, Filippo; Gaspardone, Achille; Tomai, Fabrizio; Shoulders, Carol; Fazio, Anna De; Versaci, Francesco; Iamele, Maria; Roncaglioni, Carla; Gioffré, Maria; Maseri, Attilio; Gioffré, Pier A.

In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Vol. 23, No. 6, 1994, p. 1472-1478.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Crea, Filippo ; Gaspardone, Achille ; Tomai, Fabrizio ; Shoulders, Carol ; Fazio, Anna De ; Versaci, Francesco ; Iamele, Maria ; Roncaglioni, Carla ; Gioffré, Maria ; Maseri, Attilio ; Gioffré, Pier A. / Risk factors in schoolchildren associated with a family history of unheralded myocardial infarction or uncomplicated stable angina in male relatives. In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology. 1994 ; Vol. 23, No. 6. pp. 1472-1478.
@article{0ed35cdb858e4f19b33e19a053bab2d8,
title = "Risk factors in schoolchildren associated with a family history of unheralded myocardial infarction or uncomplicated stable angina in male relatives",
abstract = "Objectives. The aim of this study was to compare risk factors for coronary atherosclerosis in children with a family history of unheralded myocardial infarction or uncomplicated stable angina. Background. In patients with unheralded myocardial infarction, coronary atherosclerosis might have a greater tendency to cause acute coronary occlusion than in patients with uncomplicated stable angina, suggesting the possibility of different risk factors in these two groups of patients. Methods. Serum lipid levels were compared in children with a family history of unheralded myocardial infarction (236 children) or uncomplicated stable angina (48 children) or no family history of ischemic heart disease (613 children). Results. Mean (± 1 SD) total serum cholesterol was higher in children with a family history of myocardial infarction than in control subjects (161 ± 28 vs. 154 ± 25 mg{\%}, p <0.01). In children with a family history of stable angina, mean total serum cholesterol (159 ± 25 mg{\%}) was similar to that in children with family history of myocardial infarction. High density lipoprotein cholesterol and apolipoprotein A-I were higher in children with family history of stable angina than in children with family history of myocardial infarction and control subjects (69 ± 18 vs. 61 ± 13 and 60 ± 13 mg{\%}, p <0.01; 143 ± 23 vs. 130 ± 18 and 129 ± 18 mg{\%}, p <0.01, respectively). in children with a family history of myocardial infarction, the low density/high density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio was significantly higher than in control subjects (1.53 ± 0.64 vs. 1.44 ± 0.56, p <0.05). Conversely, in children with a family history of stable angina, this ratio (1.24 ± 0.51) was significantly lower (p <0.05) than in control subjects. Conclusions. Risk factors for coronary athersclerosis in children with a family history of unheralded myocardial infraction are different from those in children with a family history of uncomplicated stable angina. Higher levels of apolipoprotein A-I early in life might reduce the risk of acute coronary syndromes.",
author = "Filippo Crea and Achille Gaspardone and Fabrizio Tomai and Carol Shoulders and Fazio, {Anna De} and Francesco Versaci and Maria Iamele and Carla Roncaglioni and Maria Gioffr{\'e} and Attilio Maseri and Gioffr{\'e}, {Pier A.}",
year = "1994",
doi = "10.1016/0735-1097(94)90394-8",
language = "English",
volume = "23",
pages = "1472--1478",
journal = "Journal of the American College of Cardiology",
issn = "0735-1097",
publisher = "Elsevier USA",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Risk factors in schoolchildren associated with a family history of unheralded myocardial infarction or uncomplicated stable angina in male relatives

AU - Crea, Filippo

AU - Gaspardone, Achille

AU - Tomai, Fabrizio

AU - Shoulders, Carol

AU - Fazio, Anna De

AU - Versaci, Francesco

AU - Iamele, Maria

AU - Roncaglioni, Carla

AU - Gioffré, Maria

AU - Maseri, Attilio

AU - Gioffré, Pier A.

PY - 1994

Y1 - 1994

N2 - Objectives. The aim of this study was to compare risk factors for coronary atherosclerosis in children with a family history of unheralded myocardial infarction or uncomplicated stable angina. Background. In patients with unheralded myocardial infarction, coronary atherosclerosis might have a greater tendency to cause acute coronary occlusion than in patients with uncomplicated stable angina, suggesting the possibility of different risk factors in these two groups of patients. Methods. Serum lipid levels were compared in children with a family history of unheralded myocardial infarction (236 children) or uncomplicated stable angina (48 children) or no family history of ischemic heart disease (613 children). Results. Mean (± 1 SD) total serum cholesterol was higher in children with a family history of myocardial infarction than in control subjects (161 ± 28 vs. 154 ± 25 mg%, p <0.01). In children with a family history of stable angina, mean total serum cholesterol (159 ± 25 mg%) was similar to that in children with family history of myocardial infarction. High density lipoprotein cholesterol and apolipoprotein A-I were higher in children with family history of stable angina than in children with family history of myocardial infarction and control subjects (69 ± 18 vs. 61 ± 13 and 60 ± 13 mg%, p <0.01; 143 ± 23 vs. 130 ± 18 and 129 ± 18 mg%, p <0.01, respectively). in children with a family history of myocardial infarction, the low density/high density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio was significantly higher than in control subjects (1.53 ± 0.64 vs. 1.44 ± 0.56, p <0.05). Conversely, in children with a family history of stable angina, this ratio (1.24 ± 0.51) was significantly lower (p <0.05) than in control subjects. Conclusions. Risk factors for coronary athersclerosis in children with a family history of unheralded myocardial infraction are different from those in children with a family history of uncomplicated stable angina. Higher levels of apolipoprotein A-I early in life might reduce the risk of acute coronary syndromes.

AB - Objectives. The aim of this study was to compare risk factors for coronary atherosclerosis in children with a family history of unheralded myocardial infarction or uncomplicated stable angina. Background. In patients with unheralded myocardial infarction, coronary atherosclerosis might have a greater tendency to cause acute coronary occlusion than in patients with uncomplicated stable angina, suggesting the possibility of different risk factors in these two groups of patients. Methods. Serum lipid levels were compared in children with a family history of unheralded myocardial infarction (236 children) or uncomplicated stable angina (48 children) or no family history of ischemic heart disease (613 children). Results. Mean (± 1 SD) total serum cholesterol was higher in children with a family history of myocardial infarction than in control subjects (161 ± 28 vs. 154 ± 25 mg%, p <0.01). In children with a family history of stable angina, mean total serum cholesterol (159 ± 25 mg%) was similar to that in children with family history of myocardial infarction. High density lipoprotein cholesterol and apolipoprotein A-I were higher in children with family history of stable angina than in children with family history of myocardial infarction and control subjects (69 ± 18 vs. 61 ± 13 and 60 ± 13 mg%, p <0.01; 143 ± 23 vs. 130 ± 18 and 129 ± 18 mg%, p <0.01, respectively). in children with a family history of myocardial infarction, the low density/high density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio was significantly higher than in control subjects (1.53 ± 0.64 vs. 1.44 ± 0.56, p <0.05). Conversely, in children with a family history of stable angina, this ratio (1.24 ± 0.51) was significantly lower (p <0.05) than in control subjects. Conclusions. Risk factors for coronary athersclerosis in children with a family history of unheralded myocardial infraction are different from those in children with a family history of uncomplicated stable angina. Higher levels of apolipoprotein A-I early in life might reduce the risk of acute coronary syndromes.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0028276940&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0028276940&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/0735-1097(94)90394-8

DO - 10.1016/0735-1097(94)90394-8

M3 - Article

C2 - 8176109

AN - SCOPUS:0028276940

VL - 23

SP - 1472

EP - 1478

JO - Journal of the American College of Cardiology

JF - Journal of the American College of Cardiology

SN - 0735-1097

IS - 6

ER -