Risk stratification in cardiomyopathy

Gianfranco Sinagra, Cosimo Carriere, Francesco Clemenza, Chiara Minà, Francesco Bandera, Denise Zaffalon, Paola Gugliandolo, Marco Merlo, Marco Guazzi, Piergiuseppe Agostoni

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Prognostic stratification of cardiomyopathies represents a cornerstone for the appropriate management of patients and is focused mainly on arrhythmic events and heart failure. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing provides additional prognostic information, particularly in the setting of heart failure. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing data, integrated in scores such as the Metabolism Exercise Cardiac Kidney Index score have been shown to improve the risk stratification of these patients. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing has been analysed as a potential supplier of prognostic parameters in the context of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, for which it has been shown that a reduced oxygen consumption peak, an increased ventilation/carbon dioxide production slope and chronotropic incompetence correlate with a worse prognosis. To a lesser extent, in dilated cardiomyopathy, it has been shown that the percentage of oxygen consumption peak, not the pure value, and the ventilation/carbon dioxide production slope are associated with a greater cardiovascular risk. Few data are available about other cardiomyopathies (arrhythmogenic and restrictive). Cardiomyopathy patients should be early and routinely referred to heart failure advanced centres in order to perform a comprehensive risk stratification which should include a cardiopulmonary exercise test, with variables and cut-offs shown to improve their risk stratification.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)52-58
Number of pages7
JournalEur. J. Prev. Cardiol.
Volume27
Issue number2_suppl
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2020

Keywords

  • Cardiomyopathy
  • CPET
  • exercise
  • MECKY score
  • prognosis
  • risk stratification

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