Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis: an effective tool to predict implant survival after an all-poly unicompartmental knee arthroplasty—a 10 year follow-up study

Danilo Bruni, Laura Bragonzoni, Michele Gagliardi, Marco Bontempi, Ibrahim Akkawi, Giovanni Francesco Raspugli, Francesco Iacono, Silvio Patella, Maurilio Marcacci

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: The main purpose of the present study was to determine long-term implant fixation of 15 unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKAs) with an all-poly tibial component using Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (RSA) at a mean 10-year follow-up. The secondary purpose was to investigate whether the progressive loss of implant’s fixation correlates with a reduction in Knee society score (KSS). Methods: Fifteen non-consecutive patients with primary knee osteoarthritis received a UKA with an all-poly tibial component were assessed using KSS scores pre-operatively and post-operatively and RSA on day 2 after surgery, then at 3, 6, and 12 months and yearly thereafter. The mean last follow-up was 10 years. Results: An increase in maximum total point motion (MTPM) values from 6 months to 1 year post-operatively was found respect to post-operative reference. Implants’ displacement values were always 0.2 mm in revised UKAs. A linear and negative correlation with statistical significance was found between MTPM and both clinical and functional KSS scores (p 

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3273-3280
Number of pages8
JournalKnee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy
Volume23
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 11 2014

Keywords

  • All-poly tibial component unicompartmental knee arthroplasty
  • Implant fixation
  • Maximum total point motion
  • Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Surgery

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