Role of B-cells in growth hormone-immune interactions.

R. G. Rapaport, M. Bozzola

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Cells demonstrating cell surface markers for B-cells tend to be normal in growth hormone (GH)-deficient children. Treatment with pituitary-derived or recombinant human GH, however, produces a significant, albeit transient, decrease in the number of these cells both in vitro and in vivo. Receptors for GH have been detected on numerous cells of the immune system, notably B-cells and monocytes. Recent studies have shown that cells of the immune system are able to produce peptide hormones, such as GH, and studies in the rat (which have yet to be confirmed in humans) suggest that the B-cell is the cell type most involved in this production. These findings suggest that the B-cell has a significant role in the bi-directional communication network between the endocrine and immune systems.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)82-83
Number of pages2
JournalActa Paediatrica, International Journal of Paediatrics, Supplement
Volume423
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1997

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Growth Hormone
B-Lymphocytes
Immune System
Somatotropin Receptors
Endocrine System
Human Growth Hormone
Peptide Hormones
Monocytes
Cell Count
Communication
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Role of B-cells in growth hormone-immune interactions. / Rapaport, R. G.; Bozzola, M.

In: Acta Paediatrica, International Journal of Paediatrics, Supplement, Vol. 423, 11.1997, p. 82-83.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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