Role of cardiac biomarkers (troponin I and CK-MB) as predictors of quality of life and long-term outcome after cardiac surgery

Elena Bignami, Giovanni Landoni, Giuseppe Crescenzi, Massimiliano Gonfalini, Giovanna Bruno, Federico Pappalardo, Giovanni Marino, Alberto Zangrillo, Ottavio Alfieri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Perioperative and postoperative morbidity and mortality associated with cardiac surgery affect both the outcome and quality of life. Markers such as troponin effectively predict short-term outcome. In a prospective cohort study in a University Hospital we assessed the role of cardiac biomarkers, also as predictors of longterm outcome and life quality after cardiac surgery with a three-year follow-up after conventional heart surgery. Patients were interviewed via phone calls with a structured questionnaire examining general health, functional status, activities of daily living, perception of life quality and need for hospital readmission. Descriptive statistics and multivariate analysis were performed. Out of 252 consecutive patients, 8 (3.2%) died at the three years follow up: 7 for cardiac complications and 1 for cancer. Thirty-six patients (13.5%) had hospital readmission for cardiac causes (mostly for atrial fibrillation or other arrhythmias (9.3%), but none needed cardiac surgical reintervention; 21 patients (7.9%) were hospitalised for non-cardiac causes. No limitation in function activities of daily living was reported by most patients (94%), 92% perceived their general health as excellent, very good or good and none considered it insufficient; 80% were NYHA I, 17% NYHA II, 3% NYHA III and none NYHA IV. Multivariate analysis indicated preoperative treatment with digitalis or nitrates, and postoperative cardiac biomarkers release was independently associated to death. Elevated cardiac biomarker release and length of hospital stay were the only postoperative independent predictors of death in this study.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)22-26
Number of pages5
JournalAnnals of Cardiac Anaesthesia
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

Fingerprint

Troponin I
Thoracic Surgery
Biomarkers
Quality of Life
Patient Readmission
Activities of Daily Living
Length of Stay
Multivariate Analysis
Troponin
Digitalis
Nitrates
Atrial Fibrillation
Health Status
Cardiac Arrhythmias
Cohort Studies
Prospective Studies
Morbidity
Mortality
Health
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Cardiac biomarkers
  • Mortality
  • Outcome
  • Quality of life
  • Troponin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Role of cardiac biomarkers (troponin I and CK-MB) as predictors of quality of life and long-term outcome after cardiac surgery. / Bignami, Elena; Landoni, Giovanni; Crescenzi, Giuseppe; Gonfalini, Massimiliano; Bruno, Giovanna; Pappalardo, Federico; Marino, Giovanni; Zangrillo, Alberto; Alfieri, Ottavio.

In: Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia, Vol. 12, No. 1, 2009, p. 22-26.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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