Role of endothelin-1 in exposure to high altitude: Acute mountain sickness and endothelin-1 (ACME-1) study

Pietro Amedeo Modesti, Simone Vanni, Marco Morabito, Alessandra Modesti, Matilde Marchetta, Tania Gamberi, Francesco Sofi, Giulio Savia, Giuseppe Mancia, Gian Franco Gensini, Gianfranco Parati

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND - The degree of pulmonary hypertension in healthy subjects exposed to acute hypobaric hypoxia at high altitude was found to be related to increased plasma endothelin (ET)-1. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of ET-1 antagonism on pulmonary hypertension, renal water, and sodium balance under acute and prolonged exposure to high-altitude-associated hypoxia. METHODS AND RESULTS - In a double-blind fashion, healthy volunteers were randomly assigned to receive bosentan (62.5 mg for 1 day and 125 mg for the following 2 days; n=10) or placebo (n=10) at sea level and after rapid ascent to high altitude (4559 m). At sea level, bosentan did not induce any significant changes in hemodynamic or renal parameters. At altitude, bosentan induced a significant reduction of systolic pulmonary artery pressure (21±7 versus 31±7 mm Hg, P

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1410-1416
Number of pages7
JournalCirculation
Volume114
Issue number13
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2006

Keywords

  • Altitude
  • Endothelin
  • Hypoxia
  • Lung
  • Oxygen
  • Pressure
  • Pulmonary heart disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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