Role of human-tissue transglutaminase IgG and anti-gliadin IgG antibodies in the diagnosis of coeliac disease in patients with selective immunoglobulin A deficiency

A. Lenhardt, A. Plebani, F. Marchetti, T. Gerarduzzi, T. Not, A. Meini, V. Villanacci, S. Martelossi, A. Ventura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background. Selective IgA deficiency is associated with coeliac disease, and studies have shown an increased prevalence of coeliac disease in these patients ranging from 0.71 to 30.7%, depending on the test used for screening. Aims. To determine the sensitivity of IgG anti-gliadin-a ntibodies and of IgG human-tissue-transglutaminase for diagnosing coeliac disease and assessing its prevalence in subjects with IgA deficiency. Subjects. We tested serum samples from 126 IgA-deficient children (66 female, median age: 10.8 years). Methods. All samples were analysed to measure IgG anti-gliadin-antibodies and IgG anti-human-tissue-transglutaminase. Patients testing positive to either test underwent intestinal biopsy. Subjects testing positive for IgG anti-human-tissue-transglutaminase underwent genetic testing for the human leucocyte antigen heterodimer. Results. Twenty-seven of 126 subjects tested positive for IgG anti-gliadin-antibodies (five of whom tested positive also for IgG anti-human-tissue-transglutaminase) and 18 (including the aforementioned five) for IgG anti-human-tissue-transglutaminase. Intestinal biopsy was performed in 37 of the 40 patients who tested positive (three subjects refused). Eleven had positive intestinal biopsies all of whom tested positive for IgG anti-human-tissue-transglutaminase, but only five of these tested positive also for IgG anti-gliadin-antibodies. All 22 patients testing positive for anti-gliadin-antibody alone had normal intestinal mucosa. All the patients who tested positive for IgG anti-human-tissue-transglutaminase and underwent genetic screening (15/ 18) had the coeliac-related human leucocyte antigen. Overall, coeliac disease was diagnosed in 11 of the 126 subjects with IgA deficiency (8.7%). Conclusions. The prevalence of coeliac disease in subjects with total IgA deficiency was 8.7%. Assay of IgG anti-human-tissue-transglutaminase can be recommended for screening coeliac disease in IgA-deficient subjects.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)730-734
Number of pages5
JournalDigestive and Liver Disease
Volume36
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2004

Fingerprint

Gliadin
Celiac Disease
Immunoglobulin A
Immunoglobulin G
IgA Deficiency
Antibodies
Anti-Idiotypic Antibodies
Genetic Testing
HLA Antigens
Biopsy
anti-IgG
transglutaminase 2
Intestinal Mucosa
Abdomen

Keywords

  • Anti-human-tissue-transglutaminase IgG
  • Coeliac disease
  • Selective IgA deficiency

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Role of human-tissue transglutaminase IgG and anti-gliadin IgG antibodies in the diagnosis of coeliac disease in patients with selective immunoglobulin A deficiency. / Lenhardt, A.; Plebani, A.; Marchetti, F.; Gerarduzzi, T.; Not, T.; Meini, A.; Villanacci, V.; Martelossi, S.; Ventura, A.

In: Digestive and Liver Disease, Vol. 36, No. 11, 11.2004, p. 730-734.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lenhardt, A. ; Plebani, A. ; Marchetti, F. ; Gerarduzzi, T. ; Not, T. ; Meini, A. ; Villanacci, V. ; Martelossi, S. ; Ventura, A. / Role of human-tissue transglutaminase IgG and anti-gliadin IgG antibodies in the diagnosis of coeliac disease in patients with selective immunoglobulin A deficiency. In: Digestive and Liver Disease. 2004 ; Vol. 36, No. 11. pp. 730-734.
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T1 - Role of human-tissue transglutaminase IgG and anti-gliadin IgG antibodies in the diagnosis of coeliac disease in patients with selective immunoglobulin A deficiency

AU - Lenhardt, A.

AU - Plebani, A.

AU - Marchetti, F.

AU - Gerarduzzi, T.

AU - Not, T.

AU - Meini, A.

AU - Villanacci, V.

AU - Martelossi, S.

AU - Ventura, A.

PY - 2004/11

Y1 - 2004/11

N2 - Background. Selective IgA deficiency is associated with coeliac disease, and studies have shown an increased prevalence of coeliac disease in these patients ranging from 0.71 to 30.7%, depending on the test used for screening. Aims. To determine the sensitivity of IgG anti-gliadin-a ntibodies and of IgG human-tissue-transglutaminase for diagnosing coeliac disease and assessing its prevalence in subjects with IgA deficiency. Subjects. We tested serum samples from 126 IgA-deficient children (66 female, median age: 10.8 years). Methods. All samples were analysed to measure IgG anti-gliadin-antibodies and IgG anti-human-tissue-transglutaminase. Patients testing positive to either test underwent intestinal biopsy. Subjects testing positive for IgG anti-human-tissue-transglutaminase underwent genetic testing for the human leucocyte antigen heterodimer. Results. Twenty-seven of 126 subjects tested positive for IgG anti-gliadin-antibodies (five of whom tested positive also for IgG anti-human-tissue-transglutaminase) and 18 (including the aforementioned five) for IgG anti-human-tissue-transglutaminase. Intestinal biopsy was performed in 37 of the 40 patients who tested positive (three subjects refused). Eleven had positive intestinal biopsies all of whom tested positive for IgG anti-human-tissue-transglutaminase, but only five of these tested positive also for IgG anti-gliadin-antibodies. All 22 patients testing positive for anti-gliadin-antibody alone had normal intestinal mucosa. All the patients who tested positive for IgG anti-human-tissue-transglutaminase and underwent genetic screening (15/ 18) had the coeliac-related human leucocyte antigen. Overall, coeliac disease was diagnosed in 11 of the 126 subjects with IgA deficiency (8.7%). Conclusions. The prevalence of coeliac disease in subjects with total IgA deficiency was 8.7%. Assay of IgG anti-human-tissue-transglutaminase can be recommended for screening coeliac disease in IgA-deficient subjects.

AB - Background. Selective IgA deficiency is associated with coeliac disease, and studies have shown an increased prevalence of coeliac disease in these patients ranging from 0.71 to 30.7%, depending on the test used for screening. Aims. To determine the sensitivity of IgG anti-gliadin-a ntibodies and of IgG human-tissue-transglutaminase for diagnosing coeliac disease and assessing its prevalence in subjects with IgA deficiency. Subjects. We tested serum samples from 126 IgA-deficient children (66 female, median age: 10.8 years). Methods. All samples were analysed to measure IgG anti-gliadin-antibodies and IgG anti-human-tissue-transglutaminase. Patients testing positive to either test underwent intestinal biopsy. Subjects testing positive for IgG anti-human-tissue-transglutaminase underwent genetic testing for the human leucocyte antigen heterodimer. Results. Twenty-seven of 126 subjects tested positive for IgG anti-gliadin-antibodies (five of whom tested positive also for IgG anti-human-tissue-transglutaminase) and 18 (including the aforementioned five) for IgG anti-human-tissue-transglutaminase. Intestinal biopsy was performed in 37 of the 40 patients who tested positive (three subjects refused). Eleven had positive intestinal biopsies all of whom tested positive for IgG anti-human-tissue-transglutaminase, but only five of these tested positive also for IgG anti-gliadin-antibodies. All 22 patients testing positive for anti-gliadin-antibody alone had normal intestinal mucosa. All the patients who tested positive for IgG anti-human-tissue-transglutaminase and underwent genetic screening (15/ 18) had the coeliac-related human leucocyte antigen. Overall, coeliac disease was diagnosed in 11 of the 126 subjects with IgA deficiency (8.7%). Conclusions. The prevalence of coeliac disease in subjects with total IgA deficiency was 8.7%. Assay of IgG anti-human-tissue-transglutaminase can be recommended for screening coeliac disease in IgA-deficient subjects.

KW - Anti-human-tissue-transglutaminase IgG

KW - Coeliac disease

KW - Selective IgA deficiency

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