S100B is not a reliable prognostic index in paediatric TBI

O. Piazza, M. P. Storti, S. Cotena, F. Stoppa, D. Perrotta, G. Esposito, N. Pirozzi, R. Tufano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

60 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: As far as paediatric traumatic brain injury is concerned, it is difficult to quantify the extent of the primary insult, to monitor secondary changes and to predict neurological outcomes by means of the currently used diagnostic tools: physical examination, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score and computed tomography. For this reason, several papers focused on the use of biochemical markers (S100B, neuron-specific enolase) to detect and define the severity of brain damage and predict outcome after traumatic head injury or cardiac arrest. Objective: The aim of this paper is measuring the range of S100B serum concentrations in children affected by traumatic brain injury and describing the possible roles of this protein in the reaction to trauma. Methods: Fifteen children aged 1-15 years were included in the study. Traumatic brain injury severity was defined by paediatric GCS score as mild (9 patients), moderate (2 patients) or severe (4 patients). Blood samples for S100B serum measurement were taken at emergency department admission and after 48 h. Results: The serum S100B concentration was higher in the group of severe trauma patients, who scored the lowest on the GCS at admission, and among them, the highest values were reported by the children with concomitant peripheral lesions. Conclusions: The role of S100B in paediatric traumatic brain injury has not been clarified yet, and the interpretation of its increase when the head trauma is associated with other injuries needs the understanding of the physiopathological mechanisms that rule its release in the systemic circulation. The levels of S100B in serum after a brain injury could be related to the mechanical discharge from a destroyed blood-brain barrier, or they could be due to the active expression by the brain, as a part of its involvement in the systemic inflammatory reaction. Early increase of this protein is not a reliable prognostic index of neurological outcome after pediatric traumatic brain injury, since even very elevated values are compatible with a complete neurological recovery.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)258-264
Number of pages7
JournalPediatric Neurosurgery
Volume43
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2007

Fingerprint

Glasgow Coma Scale
Pediatrics
Serum
Craniocerebral Trauma
Wounds and Injuries
Phosphopyruvate Hydratase
Brain
Heart Arrest
Blood-Brain Barrier
Brain Injuries
Physical Examination
Hospital Emergency Service
Proteins
Biomarkers
Tomography
Traumatic Brain Injury

Keywords

  • S100B
  • Traumatic brain injury, children
  • Traumatic brain injury, prognosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Piazza, O., Storti, M. P., Cotena, S., Stoppa, F., Perrotta, D., Esposito, G., ... Tufano, R. (2007). S100B is not a reliable prognostic index in paediatric TBI. Pediatric Neurosurgery, 43(4), 258-264. https://doi.org/10.1159/000103304

S100B is not a reliable prognostic index in paediatric TBI. / Piazza, O.; Storti, M. P.; Cotena, S.; Stoppa, F.; Perrotta, D.; Esposito, G.; Pirozzi, N.; Tufano, R.

In: Pediatric Neurosurgery, Vol. 43, No. 4, 07.2007, p. 258-264.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Piazza, O, Storti, MP, Cotena, S, Stoppa, F, Perrotta, D, Esposito, G, Pirozzi, N & Tufano, R 2007, 'S100B is not a reliable prognostic index in paediatric TBI', Pediatric Neurosurgery, vol. 43, no. 4, pp. 258-264. https://doi.org/10.1159/000103304
Piazza O, Storti MP, Cotena S, Stoppa F, Perrotta D, Esposito G et al. S100B is not a reliable prognostic index in paediatric TBI. Pediatric Neurosurgery. 2007 Jul;43(4):258-264. https://doi.org/10.1159/000103304
Piazza, O. ; Storti, M. P. ; Cotena, S. ; Stoppa, F. ; Perrotta, D. ; Esposito, G. ; Pirozzi, N. ; Tufano, R. / S100B is not a reliable prognostic index in paediatric TBI. In: Pediatric Neurosurgery. 2007 ; Vol. 43, No. 4. pp. 258-264.
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