Saccadic eye movements cause compression of time as well as space

M. Concetta Morrone, John Ross, David Burr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

There is now considerable evidence that space is compressed when stimuli are flashed shortly before or after the onset of a saccadic eye movement. Here we report that short intervals of time between two successive perisaccadic visual (but not auditory) stimuli are also underestimated, indicating a compression of perceived time. We were even more surprised that in a critical interval before saccades, perceived temporal order is consistently reversed. The very similar time courses of spatial and temporal compression suggest that both are mediated by a common neural mechanism, probably related to the predictive shifts that occur in receptive fields of many visual areas at the time of saccades.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)950-954
Number of pages5
JournalNature Neuroscience
Volume8
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 25 2005

Fingerprint

Saccades
Visual Fields

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Saccadic eye movements cause compression of time as well as space. / Morrone, M. Concetta; Ross, John; Burr, David.

In: Nature Neuroscience, Vol. 8, No. 7, 25.07.2005, p. 950-954.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Morrone, M. Concetta ; Ross, John ; Burr, David. / Saccadic eye movements cause compression of time as well as space. In: Nature Neuroscience. 2005 ; Vol. 8, No. 7. pp. 950-954.
@article{23e5b49571714c5a893b828e28be27e5,
title = "Saccadic eye movements cause compression of time as well as space",
abstract = "There is now considerable evidence that space is compressed when stimuli are flashed shortly before or after the onset of a saccadic eye movement. Here we report that short intervals of time between two successive perisaccadic visual (but not auditory) stimuli are also underestimated, indicating a compression of perceived time. We were even more surprised that in a critical interval before saccades, perceived temporal order is consistently reversed. The very similar time courses of spatial and temporal compression suggest that both are mediated by a common neural mechanism, probably related to the predictive shifts that occur in receptive fields of many visual areas at the time of saccades.",
author = "Morrone, {M. Concetta} and John Ross and David Burr",
year = "2005",
month = "7",
day = "25",
doi = "10.1038/nn1488",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
pages = "950--954",
journal = "Nature Neuroscience",
issn = "1097-6256",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Saccadic eye movements cause compression of time as well as space

AU - Morrone, M. Concetta

AU - Ross, John

AU - Burr, David

PY - 2005/7/25

Y1 - 2005/7/25

N2 - There is now considerable evidence that space is compressed when stimuli are flashed shortly before or after the onset of a saccadic eye movement. Here we report that short intervals of time between two successive perisaccadic visual (but not auditory) stimuli are also underestimated, indicating a compression of perceived time. We were even more surprised that in a critical interval before saccades, perceived temporal order is consistently reversed. The very similar time courses of spatial and temporal compression suggest that both are mediated by a common neural mechanism, probably related to the predictive shifts that occur in receptive fields of many visual areas at the time of saccades.

AB - There is now considerable evidence that space is compressed when stimuli are flashed shortly before or after the onset of a saccadic eye movement. Here we report that short intervals of time between two successive perisaccadic visual (but not auditory) stimuli are also underestimated, indicating a compression of perceived time. We were even more surprised that in a critical interval before saccades, perceived temporal order is consistently reversed. The very similar time courses of spatial and temporal compression suggest that both are mediated by a common neural mechanism, probably related to the predictive shifts that occur in receptive fields of many visual areas at the time of saccades.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=24944468273&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=24944468273&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/nn1488

DO - 10.1038/nn1488

M3 - Article

C2 - 15965472

AN - SCOPUS:24944468273

VL - 8

SP - 950

EP - 954

JO - Nature Neuroscience

JF - Nature Neuroscience

SN - 1097-6256

IS - 7

ER -