Safety and efficacy of doxazosin as an "add-on" antihypertensive therapy in mild to moderate heart failure patients

Roberto Spoladore, Rosa Roccaforte, Gabriele Fragasso, Chiara Gardini, Altin Palloshi, Amarild Cuko, Francesco Arioli, Anna Salerno, Alberto Margonato

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective - Doxazosin treatment has been discouraged in hypertensive patients in order to prevent heart failure (HF) development. However, this drug is still prescribed as an "add-on" medication to achieve a better blood pressure (BP) control. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of doxazosin as an "add-on" medication in HF patients with uncontrolled hypertension. Methods and results - We reviewed our HF clinic files to collect patient variables recorded at baseline and during follow-up visits in patients receiving, or not, doxazosin. We compared HF-related hospitalization rates and all-cause and cardiovascular mortality rates between patients on doxazosin and those not on doxazosin. We constructed cumulative risk curves for time to first event (HF-related hospitalization and/or death) for both groups of patients. Fifty-two HF patients had been prescribed doxazosin. At baseline, several relevant variables were unevenly distributed between patients receiving doxazosin and those not receiving doxazosin (N = 122), such as left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and NYHA class. HF-related hospitalization and death rates were similar between patients on doxazosin and those not on doxazosin at the end of the follow-up. Even after adjustment for all potentially confounding variables, doxazosin was not associated with HF-related hospitalization and/or death. Doxazosin significantly reduced BP, but did not affect NYHA class. Conclusions - Doxazosin, "on top" of other antihypertensive treatments was safe and effective, and did not appear to be associated with HF-related hospitalization and mortality rates in our patients with mild/moderate HF.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)485-491
Number of pages7
JournalActa Cardiologica
Volume64
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2009

Fingerprint

Doxazosin
Antihypertensive Agents
Heart Failure
Safety
Hospitalization
Therapeutics
Mortality
Blood Pressure
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Stroke Volume

Keywords

  • Antihypertensive therapy
  • Doxazosin
  • Heart failure
  • Prognosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Safety and efficacy of doxazosin as an "add-on" antihypertensive therapy in mild to moderate heart failure patients. / Spoladore, Roberto; Roccaforte, Rosa; Fragasso, Gabriele; Gardini, Chiara; Palloshi, Altin; Cuko, Amarild; Arioli, Francesco; Salerno, Anna; Margonato, Alberto.

In: Acta Cardiologica, Vol. 64, No. 4, 08.2009, p. 485-491.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Spoladore, Roberto ; Roccaforte, Rosa ; Fragasso, Gabriele ; Gardini, Chiara ; Palloshi, Altin ; Cuko, Amarild ; Arioli, Francesco ; Salerno, Anna ; Margonato, Alberto. / Safety and efficacy of doxazosin as an "add-on" antihypertensive therapy in mild to moderate heart failure patients. In: Acta Cardiologica. 2009 ; Vol. 64, No. 4. pp. 485-491.
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AU - Margonato, Alberto

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