Sagittal and vertical effects of rapid maxillary expansion in Class I, II, and III occlusions

Giampietro Farronato, Lucia Giannini, Guido Galbiati, Cinzia Maspero

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate and compare the skeletal vertical and sagittal effects of the Hyrax expander in Class I, II, and III patients. Materials and Methods: One hundred and eighty-three patients (91 females, 92 males) with a mean age of 8.7 years and with maxillary bilateral cross-bite and maxillary hypoplasia were analyzed retrospectively. They were divided into three groups according to their skeletal class. Sixty-five patients were skeletal Class I, 55 were skeletal Class II, and 63 were skeletal Class III. For each patient a lateral cephalogram was obtained before treatment and at the end of the retention period. Changes in the groups during the observation period were calculated, compared, and statistically analyzed with a t-test. Results: In terms of vertical effects, a statistically significant increase in the anterior vertical dimension was observed only in Class III patients. No statistically significant changes were observed in the posterior vertical dimension in any of the groups. In terms of sagittal effects, in Class I patients the maxilla and the mandible moved forward, but not in a statistically significant way, and the ANB angle showed a statistically significant decrease, but its change was less modified. In Class II patients the maxilla moved forward, but not in a statistically significant way, while the mandible moved forward in all of the patients in a statistically significant manner. The ANB decreased, statistically improving the skeletal classification. In Class III patients the maxilla moved forward in a statistically significant manner; the mandible showed a downward and backward rotation, improving the skeletal classification. Conclusions: The data obtained in this study permit us to confirm that rapid maxillary expansion can be used in all of the skeletal classes with good vertical and sagittal results.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)298-303
Number of pages6
JournalAngle Orthodontist
Volume81
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2011

Fingerprint

Palatal Expansion Technique
Maxilla
Mandible
Vertical Dimension
Hyraxes
Malocclusion
Observation

Keywords

  • Hyrax expander
  • Maxillary hypoplasia
  • Rapid maxillary expansion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthodontics

Cite this

Sagittal and vertical effects of rapid maxillary expansion in Class I, II, and III occlusions. / Farronato, Giampietro; Giannini, Lucia; Galbiati, Guido; Maspero, Cinzia.

In: Angle Orthodontist, Vol. 81, No. 2, 03.2011, p. 298-303.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{89e361dd138a46a9ac4ace7c317b2587,
title = "Sagittal and vertical effects of rapid maxillary expansion in Class I, II, and III occlusions",
abstract = "Objective: To evaluate and compare the skeletal vertical and sagittal effects of the Hyrax expander in Class I, II, and III patients. Materials and Methods: One hundred and eighty-three patients (91 females, 92 males) with a mean age of 8.7 years and with maxillary bilateral cross-bite and maxillary hypoplasia were analyzed retrospectively. They were divided into three groups according to their skeletal class. Sixty-five patients were skeletal Class I, 55 were skeletal Class II, and 63 were skeletal Class III. For each patient a lateral cephalogram was obtained before treatment and at the end of the retention period. Changes in the groups during the observation period were calculated, compared, and statistically analyzed with a t-test. Results: In terms of vertical effects, a statistically significant increase in the anterior vertical dimension was observed only in Class III patients. No statistically significant changes were observed in the posterior vertical dimension in any of the groups. In terms of sagittal effects, in Class I patients the maxilla and the mandible moved forward, but not in a statistically significant way, and the ANB angle showed a statistically significant decrease, but its change was less modified. In Class II patients the maxilla moved forward, but not in a statistically significant way, while the mandible moved forward in all of the patients in a statistically significant manner. The ANB decreased, statistically improving the skeletal classification. In Class III patients the maxilla moved forward in a statistically significant manner; the mandible showed a downward and backward rotation, improving the skeletal classification. Conclusions: The data obtained in this study permit us to confirm that rapid maxillary expansion can be used in all of the skeletal classes with good vertical and sagittal results.",
keywords = "Hyrax expander, Maxillary hypoplasia, Rapid maxillary expansion",
author = "Giampietro Farronato and Lucia Giannini and Guido Galbiati and Cinzia Maspero",
year = "2011",
month = "3",
doi = "10.2319/050410-241.1",
language = "English",
volume = "81",
pages = "298--303",
journal = "Angle Orthodontist",
issn = "0003-3219",
publisher = "E H Angle Orthodontists Research & Education Foundation, Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Sagittal and vertical effects of rapid maxillary expansion in Class I, II, and III occlusions

AU - Farronato, Giampietro

AU - Giannini, Lucia

AU - Galbiati, Guido

AU - Maspero, Cinzia

PY - 2011/3

Y1 - 2011/3

N2 - Objective: To evaluate and compare the skeletal vertical and sagittal effects of the Hyrax expander in Class I, II, and III patients. Materials and Methods: One hundred and eighty-three patients (91 females, 92 males) with a mean age of 8.7 years and with maxillary bilateral cross-bite and maxillary hypoplasia were analyzed retrospectively. They were divided into three groups according to their skeletal class. Sixty-five patients were skeletal Class I, 55 were skeletal Class II, and 63 were skeletal Class III. For each patient a lateral cephalogram was obtained before treatment and at the end of the retention period. Changes in the groups during the observation period were calculated, compared, and statistically analyzed with a t-test. Results: In terms of vertical effects, a statistically significant increase in the anterior vertical dimension was observed only in Class III patients. No statistically significant changes were observed in the posterior vertical dimension in any of the groups. In terms of sagittal effects, in Class I patients the maxilla and the mandible moved forward, but not in a statistically significant way, and the ANB angle showed a statistically significant decrease, but its change was less modified. In Class II patients the maxilla moved forward, but not in a statistically significant way, while the mandible moved forward in all of the patients in a statistically significant manner. The ANB decreased, statistically improving the skeletal classification. In Class III patients the maxilla moved forward in a statistically significant manner; the mandible showed a downward and backward rotation, improving the skeletal classification. Conclusions: The data obtained in this study permit us to confirm that rapid maxillary expansion can be used in all of the skeletal classes with good vertical and sagittal results.

AB - Objective: To evaluate and compare the skeletal vertical and sagittal effects of the Hyrax expander in Class I, II, and III patients. Materials and Methods: One hundred and eighty-three patients (91 females, 92 males) with a mean age of 8.7 years and with maxillary bilateral cross-bite and maxillary hypoplasia were analyzed retrospectively. They were divided into three groups according to their skeletal class. Sixty-five patients were skeletal Class I, 55 were skeletal Class II, and 63 were skeletal Class III. For each patient a lateral cephalogram was obtained before treatment and at the end of the retention period. Changes in the groups during the observation period were calculated, compared, and statistically analyzed with a t-test. Results: In terms of vertical effects, a statistically significant increase in the anterior vertical dimension was observed only in Class III patients. No statistically significant changes were observed in the posterior vertical dimension in any of the groups. In terms of sagittal effects, in Class I patients the maxilla and the mandible moved forward, but not in a statistically significant way, and the ANB angle showed a statistically significant decrease, but its change was less modified. In Class II patients the maxilla moved forward, but not in a statistically significant way, while the mandible moved forward in all of the patients in a statistically significant manner. The ANB decreased, statistically improving the skeletal classification. In Class III patients the maxilla moved forward in a statistically significant manner; the mandible showed a downward and backward rotation, improving the skeletal classification. Conclusions: The data obtained in this study permit us to confirm that rapid maxillary expansion can be used in all of the skeletal classes with good vertical and sagittal results.

KW - Hyrax expander

KW - Maxillary hypoplasia

KW - Rapid maxillary expansion

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=78651324920&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=78651324920&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2319/050410-241.1

DO - 10.2319/050410-241.1

M3 - Article

VL - 81

SP - 298

EP - 303

JO - Angle Orthodontist

JF - Angle Orthodontist

SN - 0003-3219

IS - 2

ER -