Scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and angiography with a wide-field contact lens system

Giovanni Staurenghi, Francesco Viola, Martin A. Mainster, Raymond D. Graham, Peter G. Harrington

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

57 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To perform fluorescein and indocyanine green angiography for large or peripheral chorioretinal structures using a contact lens system that provides a 5-fold increase in the field of view of a confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO). Methods: Separate handheld contact and noncontact ophthalmoscopic lenses were manually aligned with the optical axis of a confocal SLO to demonstrate the feasibility of wide-field SLO angiography. An integrated, widefield contact lens system was then designed and constructed to increase the SLO's 10°, 20°, and 30° imaging fields to 50°, 100°, and 150°, respectively. Results: Simultaneous fluorescein and indocyanine green angiography was performed with the integrated, widefield contact lens system for more than 50 patients with disorders that affect their peripheral retina and choroid. Retinal and choroidal abnormalities, including neovascularization and capillary nonperfusion, are easily detected and documented well beyond the range of conventional fundus cameras and SLOs. Peripheral retinal and choroidal hemodynamics can be readily observed and recorded. Conclusions: A confocal SLO has adequate resolution for clinically useful reflectance and angiographic imaging even when its field size is increased 5-fold by a widefield contact lens system. Dynamic and static wide-field angiography can be performed without the limitations of manual or computer-automated photomontages. Peripheral retinal conditions can be studied and recorded to confirm observations from indirect ophthalmoscopy and to facilitate retinal photocoagulation and vitreoretinal surgery.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)244-252
Number of pages9
JournalArchives of Ophthalmology
Volume123
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2005

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Ophthalmoscopes
Ophthalmoscopy
Contact Lenses
Angiography
Lasers
Indocyanine Green
Fluorescein
Vitreoretinal Surgery
Choroid
Light Coagulation
Lenses
Retina
Hemodynamics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and angiography with a wide-field contact lens system. / Staurenghi, Giovanni; Viola, Francesco; Mainster, Martin A.; Graham, Raymond D.; Harrington, Peter G.

In: Archives of Ophthalmology, Vol. 123, No. 2, 02.2005, p. 244-252.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Staurenghi, Giovanni ; Viola, Francesco ; Mainster, Martin A. ; Graham, Raymond D. ; Harrington, Peter G. / Scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and angiography with a wide-field contact lens system. In: Archives of Ophthalmology. 2005 ; Vol. 123, No. 2. pp. 244-252.
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