Scatter factor-dependent branching morphogenesis: Structural and histological features

Paolo M. Comoglio, L. Trusolino, C. Boccaccio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Branching morphogenesis is a multi-step process that controls the formation of polarised tubules starting from hollow cysts. Its execution entails a series of rate-limiting events which include reversible disruption of cell polarity, dismantling of intercellular contacts, acquisition of a motile phenotype, stimulation of cell proliferation, and final re-establishment of cell polarity for creation of the definitive structures. Branching morphogenesis takes place physiologically during development, accounting for the establishment of organs endowed with a ramified architecture such as glands, the respiratory tract and the vascular tree. In cancer, aberrant implementation of branching morphogenesis leads to deregulated proliferation, protection from apoptosis and enhanced migratory/invasive properties, which together exacerbate the aggressive features of neoplastic cells. Under both physiological and pathological conditions, branching morphogenesis is mainly accomplished by a family of growth factors known as scatter factors. In this review, we will summarise the current knowledge on the biological and functional roles of scatter factors during branching morphogenesis, with a special emphasis on the phenotypic (structural and histological) consequences of scatter factor activity in different tissues.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)79-92
Number of pages14
JournalEuropean journal of histochemistry : EJH
Volume51
Issue numberSUPPL.1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007

Fingerprint

Hepatocyte Growth Factor
Morphogenesis
morphogenesis
branching
Cell Polarity
process control
respiratory system
blood vessels
Respiratory System
growth factors
Blood Vessels
Cysts
cell proliferation
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
apoptosis
Cell Proliferation
Apoptosis
Phenotype
phenotype
neoplasms

Keywords

  • Branching morphogenesis
  • Cell adhesion and motility
  • Scatter factors
  • Tyrosine kinases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Histology
  • Biophysics
  • Anatomy
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Developmental Biology

Cite this

Scatter factor-dependent branching morphogenesis : Structural and histological features. / Comoglio, Paolo M.; Trusolino, L.; Boccaccio, C.

In: European journal of histochemistry : EJH, Vol. 51, No. SUPPL.1, 2007, p. 79-92.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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