Second reduced intensity conditioning allogeneic transplant as a rescue strategy for acute leukaemia patients who relapse after an initial RIC allogeneic transplantation: Analysis of risk factors and treatment outcomes

R. Vrhovac, M. Labopin, F. Ciceri, J. Finke, E. Holler, J. Tischer, B. Lioure, J. Gribben, L. Kanz, D. Blaise, P. Dreger, G. Held, R. Arnold, A. Nagler, M. Mohty

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Limited therapeutic options are available after relapse of acute leukaemia following first reduced intensity conditioning haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (RIC1). A retrospective study on European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT) registry data was performed on 234 adult patients with acute leukaemia who received a second RIC transplantation (RIC2) from 2000 to 2012 as a salvage treatment for relapse following RIC1. At the time of RIC2, 167 patients (71.4%) had relapsed or refractory disease, 49 (20.9%) were in second CR and 18 (7.7%) in third or higher CR. With a median follow-up of 21 (1.5-79) months after RIC2, 51 patients are still alive. At 2 years, the cumulative incidence of non-relapse mortality (NRM), relapse incidence (RI), leukaemia-free survival (LFS) and overall survival (OS) were 22.4% (95% confidence interval (CI): 17-28.4), 63.9% (56.7-70.1), 14.6% (8.8-18.5) and 20.5% (14.9-26.1), respectively. In patients with acute myelogenous, biphenotypic and undifferentiated leukaemia (representing 89.8% of all patients), duration of remission following RIC1 >225 days, presence of CR at RIC2, patient's Karnofsky performance status >80 at RIC2 and non-myeloablative conditioning were found to be the strongest predictors of patients' favourable outcome.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)186-193
Number of pages8
JournalBone Marrow Transplantation
Volume51
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1 2016

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Transplantation

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