Selection of cancer chemotherapy for a patient by an in vitro assay versus a clinician

Daniel D. Von Hoff, John F. Sandbach, Gary M. Clark, Judy N. Turner, Barbara F. Forseth, Martin J. Piccart, Nicoletta Colombo, Franco M. Muggia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

One hundred thirty-three patients with advanced metastatic cancer were randomized to receive single-agent chemotherapy selected by either a medical oncologist or an in vitro capillary cloning system. Thirty-six of the 65 patients (55%) who were randomly assigned to selection of a drug by the clinician actually received a drug; these patients were able to be evaluated for clinical response. Of these 36 patients, one had a partial tumor response (3%). Only 19 of the 68 patients (28%) who were randomly assigned to selection of a drug by the capillary system actually received a drug; these patients were able to be evaluated for clinical response. Of these 19 patients, four (21%) had partial tumor responses. In the assessable patients (36 in the clinician's choice group, 19 in the capillary cloning group), the partial response rate was superior for drug selection by the capillary cloning system (P = .04). For all patients randomly assigned to a group (65 in the clinician's choice group, 68 in the capillary cloning group), the response rate was not significantly different (1.5% and 5.9%, respectively; P = .37). When overall survival rates for patients in the two groups were compared, there was no difference. We conclude that drug sensitivity testing in capillary tubes can improve the response rate for patients with advanced malignancies. This improved response rate, however, does not translate into improved survival times for these patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)110-116
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the National Cancer Institute
Volume82
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Jan 17 1990

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology
  • Statistics, Probability and Uncertainty
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Physiology (medical)
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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