Selective and integrated rehabilitation programs for disturbances of visual/spatial attention and executive function after brain damage: A neuropsychological evidence-based review

P. Zoccolotti, A. Cantagallo, M. De Luca, C. Guariglia, A. Serino, L. Trojano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The present evidence-based review systematically examines the literature on the neuropsychological rehabilitation of attentional and executive dysfunctions in patients with acquired brain lesions. Four areas are considered: 1) neuropsychological rehabilitation of attentional disorders; 2) neuropsychological rehabilitation of neglect disorders; 3) neuropsychological rehabilitation of dysexecutive disorders and 4) rehabilitation trainings for patients with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI).each area, search and selection of papers were performed on several databases and integrated by crosschecking references from relevant and recent reviews. The literature up to 2007 was examined (in some areas the search was limited from 2000 to 2007). Class of evidence for each selected study was evaluated according to the SPREAD (2010) criteria. Based on this analysis, recommendations on the effectiveness of rehabilitation trainings are proposed separately for each rehabilitation method in each of the four areas considered. Information on follow-up data and impact on activities of daily living is provided whenever available.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)123-147
Number of pages25
JournalEuropean Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
Volume47
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2011

Keywords

  • Brain injuries
  • Evidencebased medicine
  • Executive function
  • Neuropsychology
  • Rehabilitation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

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