Selective uppercase dysgraphia with loss of visual imagery of letter forms: A window on the organization of graphomotor patterns

Nicoletta Del Grosso Destreri, Elisabetta Farina, Margherita Alberoni, Simone Pomati, Paolo Nichelli, Claudio Mariani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We report a patient who, after a left parieto-occipital lesion, showed alexia and selective dysgraphia for uppercase letters. He showed preserved oral spelling, associated with handwriting impairment in all written production; spontaneous writing, writing to dictation, real words, pseudowords, and single letters were affected. The great majority of errors were well-formed letter substitutions: most of them were located on the first position of each word, which the patient always wrote in uppercase (as he used to do before his illness). The patient also showed a complete inability to access the visual representation of letters. As demonstrated by a stroke segmentation analysis, letter substitutions followed a rule of graphomotor similarity. We propose that the patient's impairment was at the stage where selection of the specific graphomotor pattern for each letter is made and that the apparent selective disruption of capital case was due to a greater stroke similarity among letters belonging to the same case. We conclude that a visual format is necessary neither for spelling nor for handwriting. (C) 2000 Academic Press.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)353-372
Number of pages20
JournalBrain and Language
Volume71
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 15 2000

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Neuroscience(all)

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