Self-efficacy for coping moderates the effects of distress on quality of life in palliative cancer care

Andrea Chirico, Samantha Serpentini, Thomas V. Merluzzi, Luca Mallia, Paola Del Bianco, Rosalba Martino, Leonardo Trentin, Enrico Bucci, Michelino De Laurentiis, Eleonora Capovilla, Fabio Lucidi, Gerardo Botti, Antonio Giordano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Recent aggressive chemotherapeutic and combined treatments have resulted in increased survivorship for advanced stage breast cancer. In some patients, treatment produces an actual abatement of their cancer, while in others treatment mitigates the progression of cancer bringing those patients into palliative care where their chronic disease requires continuous management. There is also evidence that the majority of palliative-care cancer patients have a deteriorating quality of life that only precipitously declines in the final few weeks of life. The new paradigm of patientcentered care for palliative patients is resulting in a new model of treatment in which the self-efficacy seems to play an important role. The present study represents an extension of the role of self-efficacy for coping to palliative care. Using a stress-coping model, the primary aim of this study was to evaluate a process model, in which self-efficacy for coping with cancer is a moderator between stress and the quality of life in a sample of breast cancer patients in palliative care. The secondary aim was to validate a specific domain coping self-efficacy scale, the Cancer Behavior Inventory. The current study confirmed the role of self-efficacy for coping with cancer as moderator of the relationship between stress and quality of life of a sample of breast cancer patients in palliative care. In addition, this study confirmed the structure, reliability and validity of the scale.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1609-1615
Number of pages7
JournalAnticancer Research
Volume37
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1 2017

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • Care
  • Coping
  • Palliative
  • Self-efficacy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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    Chirico, A., Serpentini, S., Merluzzi, T. V., Mallia, L., Del Bianco, P., Martino, R., Trentin, L., Bucci, E., De Laurentiis, M., Capovilla, E., Lucidi, F., Botti, G., & Giordano, A. (2017). Self-efficacy for coping moderates the effects of distress on quality of life in palliative cancer care. Anticancer Research, 37(4), 1609-1615. https://doi.org/10.21873/anticanres.11491