Self-injury in people with intellectual disability and epilepsy: A matched controlled study

Serafino Buono, Fabio Scannella, Maria Bernadette Palmigiano, Maurizio Elia, Mike Kerr, Santo Di Nuovo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We aimed to identify the presence of self-injurious behavior in a sample of 158 people with intellectual disability and epilepsy as compared with a control sample consisting of 195 people with intellectual disability without epilepsy. The Italian Scale for the Assessment of self-injurious behaviors was used to describe self-injurious behavior in both groups. The groups were matched for ID degree: mild/moderate (20 and 20 respectively), severe/profound (45 in both samples) and unknown (4 in both samples). Seventy-four percent of the first sample were diagnosed with symptomatic partial epilepsy. The prevalence of self-injurious behaviors was 44% in the group with intellectual disability and epilepsy and 46.5% in the group with intellectual disability without epilepsy (difference not significant). The areas most affected by self-injurious behaviors in both samples were the hands, the mouth and the head. The most frequent types of self-injurious behaviors were self-biting, self-hitting with hands and with objects. Self-injurious behavior is frequently observed in individuals with epilepsy and intellectual disability. Our study does not suggest that the presence of epilepsy is a risk factor for self-injurious behavior in this patient group.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)160-164
Number of pages5
JournalSeizure
Volume21
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2012

Fingerprint

Self-Injurious Behavior
Disabled Persons
Intellectual Disability
Epilepsy
Wounds and Injuries
Hand
Partial Epilepsy
Mouth
Research Design
Head

Keywords

  • Epilepsy
  • Intellectual disability
  • Localization
  • Seizures
  • Self-injurious behavior
  • Topography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology

Cite this

Self-injury in people with intellectual disability and epilepsy : A matched controlled study. / Buono, Serafino; Scannella, Fabio; Palmigiano, Maria Bernadette; Elia, Maurizio; Kerr, Mike; Di Nuovo, Santo.

In: Seizure, Vol. 21, No. 3, 04.2012, p. 160-164.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Buono, Serafino ; Scannella, Fabio ; Palmigiano, Maria Bernadette ; Elia, Maurizio ; Kerr, Mike ; Di Nuovo, Santo. / Self-injury in people with intellectual disability and epilepsy : A matched controlled study. In: Seizure. 2012 ; Vol. 21, No. 3. pp. 160-164.
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