Self-motion perception and vestibulo-ocular reflex during whole body yaw rotation in standing subjects: The role of head position and neck proprioception

Roberto Panichi, Fabio Massimo Botti, Aldo Ferraresi, Mario Faralli, Artemis Kyriakareli, Marco Schieppati, Vito Enrico Pettorossi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Self-motion perception and vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) were studied during whole body yaw rotation in the dark at different static head positions. Rotations consisted of four cycles of symmetric sinusoidal and asymmetric oscillations. Self-motion perception was evaluated by measuring the ability of subjects to manually track a static remembered target. VOR was recorded separately and the slow phase eye position (SPEP) was computed. Three different head static yaw deviations (active and passive) relative to the trunk (0°, 45° to right and 45° to left) were examined. Active head deviations had a significant effect during asymmetric oscillation: the movement perception was enhanced when the head was kept turned toward the side of body rotation and decreased in the opposite direction. Conversely, passive head deviations had no effect on movement perception. Further, vibration (100. Hz) of the neck muscles splenius capitis and sternocleidomastoideus remarkably influenced perceived rotation during asymmetric oscillation. On the other hand, SPEP of VOR was modulated by active head deviation, but was not influenced by neck muscle vibration. Through its effects on motion perception and reflex gain, head position improved gaze stability and enhanced self-motion perception in the direction of the head deviation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)314-332
Number of pages19
JournalHuman Movement Science
Volume30
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2011

Fingerprint

Yaws
Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex
Motion Perception
Proprioception
Neck
Head
Neck Muscles
Vibration
Paraspinal Muscles
Aptitude
Reflex

Keywords

  • Muscle vibration
  • Neck proprioception
  • Self-motion perception
  • Vestibulo-ocular reflex
  • Whole-body rotation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Biophysics
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology

Cite this

Self-motion perception and vestibulo-ocular reflex during whole body yaw rotation in standing subjects : The role of head position and neck proprioception. / Panichi, Roberto; Botti, Fabio Massimo; Ferraresi, Aldo; Faralli, Mario; Kyriakareli, Artemis; Schieppati, Marco; Pettorossi, Vito Enrico.

In: Human Movement Science, Vol. 30, No. 2, 04.2011, p. 314-332.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Panichi, Roberto ; Botti, Fabio Massimo ; Ferraresi, Aldo ; Faralli, Mario ; Kyriakareli, Artemis ; Schieppati, Marco ; Pettorossi, Vito Enrico. / Self-motion perception and vestibulo-ocular reflex during whole body yaw rotation in standing subjects : The role of head position and neck proprioception. In: Human Movement Science. 2011 ; Vol. 30, No. 2. pp. 314-332.
@article{7ff2ebc44c8f46b09b67818fc7cca95c,
title = "Self-motion perception and vestibulo-ocular reflex during whole body yaw rotation in standing subjects: The role of head position and neck proprioception",
abstract = "Self-motion perception and vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) were studied during whole body yaw rotation in the dark at different static head positions. Rotations consisted of four cycles of symmetric sinusoidal and asymmetric oscillations. Self-motion perception was evaluated by measuring the ability of subjects to manually track a static remembered target. VOR was recorded separately and the slow phase eye position (SPEP) was computed. Three different head static yaw deviations (active and passive) relative to the trunk (0°, 45° to right and 45° to left) were examined. Active head deviations had a significant effect during asymmetric oscillation: the movement perception was enhanced when the head was kept turned toward the side of body rotation and decreased in the opposite direction. Conversely, passive head deviations had no effect on movement perception. Further, vibration (100. Hz) of the neck muscles splenius capitis and sternocleidomastoideus remarkably influenced perceived rotation during asymmetric oscillation. On the other hand, SPEP of VOR was modulated by active head deviation, but was not influenced by neck muscle vibration. Through its effects on motion perception and reflex gain, head position improved gaze stability and enhanced self-motion perception in the direction of the head deviation.",
keywords = "Muscle vibration, Neck proprioception, Self-motion perception, Vestibulo-ocular reflex, Whole-body rotation",
author = "Roberto Panichi and Botti, {Fabio Massimo} and Aldo Ferraresi and Mario Faralli and Artemis Kyriakareli and Marco Schieppati and Pettorossi, {Vito Enrico}",
year = "2011",
month = "4",
doi = "10.1016/j.humov.2010.10.005",
language = "English",
volume = "30",
pages = "314--332",
journal = "Human Movement Science",
issn = "0167-9457",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Self-motion perception and vestibulo-ocular reflex during whole body yaw rotation in standing subjects

T2 - The role of head position and neck proprioception

AU - Panichi, Roberto

AU - Botti, Fabio Massimo

AU - Ferraresi, Aldo

AU - Faralli, Mario

AU - Kyriakareli, Artemis

AU - Schieppati, Marco

AU - Pettorossi, Vito Enrico

PY - 2011/4

Y1 - 2011/4

N2 - Self-motion perception and vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) were studied during whole body yaw rotation in the dark at different static head positions. Rotations consisted of four cycles of symmetric sinusoidal and asymmetric oscillations. Self-motion perception was evaluated by measuring the ability of subjects to manually track a static remembered target. VOR was recorded separately and the slow phase eye position (SPEP) was computed. Three different head static yaw deviations (active and passive) relative to the trunk (0°, 45° to right and 45° to left) were examined. Active head deviations had a significant effect during asymmetric oscillation: the movement perception was enhanced when the head was kept turned toward the side of body rotation and decreased in the opposite direction. Conversely, passive head deviations had no effect on movement perception. Further, vibration (100. Hz) of the neck muscles splenius capitis and sternocleidomastoideus remarkably influenced perceived rotation during asymmetric oscillation. On the other hand, SPEP of VOR was modulated by active head deviation, but was not influenced by neck muscle vibration. Through its effects on motion perception and reflex gain, head position improved gaze stability and enhanced self-motion perception in the direction of the head deviation.

AB - Self-motion perception and vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) were studied during whole body yaw rotation in the dark at different static head positions. Rotations consisted of four cycles of symmetric sinusoidal and asymmetric oscillations. Self-motion perception was evaluated by measuring the ability of subjects to manually track a static remembered target. VOR was recorded separately and the slow phase eye position (SPEP) was computed. Three different head static yaw deviations (active and passive) relative to the trunk (0°, 45° to right and 45° to left) were examined. Active head deviations had a significant effect during asymmetric oscillation: the movement perception was enhanced when the head was kept turned toward the side of body rotation and decreased in the opposite direction. Conversely, passive head deviations had no effect on movement perception. Further, vibration (100. Hz) of the neck muscles splenius capitis and sternocleidomastoideus remarkably influenced perceived rotation during asymmetric oscillation. On the other hand, SPEP of VOR was modulated by active head deviation, but was not influenced by neck muscle vibration. Through its effects on motion perception and reflex gain, head position improved gaze stability and enhanced self-motion perception in the direction of the head deviation.

KW - Muscle vibration

KW - Neck proprioception

KW - Self-motion perception

KW - Vestibulo-ocular reflex

KW - Whole-body rotation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79955090072&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79955090072&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.humov.2010.10.005

DO - 10.1016/j.humov.2010.10.005

M3 - Article

C2 - 21277644

AN - SCOPUS:79955090072

VL - 30

SP - 314

EP - 332

JO - Human Movement Science

JF - Human Movement Science

SN - 0167-9457

IS - 2

ER -