Self-, parent-, and teacher-reported behavioral symptoms in youngsters with Tourette syndrome: A case-control study

Cristiano Termine, Claudia Selvini, Umberto Balottin, Chiara Luoni, Clare M. Eddy, Andrea E. Cavanna

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims: Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by multiple tics and associated with co-morbid behavioral problems (TS-plus). We investigated the usefulness of self-report versus parent- and teacher-report instruments in assisting the specialist assessment of TS-plus in a child/adolescent population. Methods: Twenty-three patients diagnosed with TS (19 males; age 13.9 ± 3.7 years) and 69 matched healthy controls participated in this study. All recruited participants completed a standardized psychometric battery, including the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI), the Self Administrated Psychiatric Scales for Children and Adolescents (SAFA) and the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory (STAXI). Parents completed the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) and Conners' Parent Rating Scales-Revised (CPRS-R). Participants' teachers completed the Conners' Teacher Rating Scales-Revised (CTRS-R). Results were compared with similar data obtained from controls. Results: Nineteen patients (82.6%) fulfilled DSM-IV-TR criteria for at least one co-morbid condition: obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD, n = 8; 34.8%); attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, n = 6; 26.1%); OCD + ADHD (n = 5; 21.7%). Scores on self-report instruments failed to show any significant differences between TS and controls. Most subscores of the CPRS-R, CTRS-R, and CBCL were significantly higher for the TS group than controls. The TS + OCD subgroup scored significantly higher than the TS-OCD subgroup on the CBCL-Externalizing, Anxious/Depressed and Obsessive-Compulsive subscales. Conclusions: Self-report instruments appear to have limited usefulness in assisting the assessment of the behavioral spectrum of young patients with TS. However, proxy-rated instruments differentiate TS populations from healthy subjects, and the CBCL can add relevant information to the clinical diagnosis of co-morbid OCD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)95-100
Number of pages6
JournalEuropean Journal of Paediatric Neurology
Volume15
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 3 2011

Fingerprint

Tourette Syndrome
Behavioral Symptoms
Case-Control Studies
Child Behavior
Checklist
Self Report
Tics
Equipment and Supplies
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
Anger
Proxy
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
Psychometrics
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Population
Psychiatry
Healthy Volunteers
Parents
Depression

Keywords

  • Attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder
  • Behavior
  • Obsessive-compulsive disorder
  • Tics
  • Tourette syndrome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Self-, parent-, and teacher-reported behavioral symptoms in youngsters with Tourette syndrome : A case-control study. / Termine, Cristiano; Selvini, Claudia; Balottin, Umberto; Luoni, Chiara; Eddy, Clare M.; Cavanna, Andrea E.

In: European Journal of Paediatric Neurology, Vol. 15, No. 2, 03.03.2011, p. 95-100.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Termine, Cristiano ; Selvini, Claudia ; Balottin, Umberto ; Luoni, Chiara ; Eddy, Clare M. ; Cavanna, Andrea E. / Self-, parent-, and teacher-reported behavioral symptoms in youngsters with Tourette syndrome : A case-control study. In: European Journal of Paediatric Neurology. 2011 ; Vol. 15, No. 2. pp. 95-100.
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AU - Eddy, Clare M.

AU - Cavanna, Andrea E.

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