Sensitivity of predicted muscle forces during gait to anatomical variability in musculotendon geometry

Lode Bosmans, Giordano Valente, Mariska Wesseling, Anke Van Campen, Friedl De Groote, Joris De Schutter, Ilse Jonkers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Scaled generic musculoskeletal models are commonly used to drive dynamic simulations of motions. It is however, acknowledged that not accounting for variability in musculoskeletal geometry and musculotendon parameters may confound the simulation results, even when analysing control subjects. This study documents the three-dimensional anatomical variability of musculotendon origins and insertions of 33 lower limb muscles determined based on magnetic resonance imaging in six subjects. This anatomical variability was compared to the musculotendon point location in a generic musculoskeletal model. Furthermore, the sensitivity of muscle forces during gait, calculated using static optimization, to perturbations of the musculotendon point location was analyzed with a generic model. More specific, a probabilistic approach was used: for each analyzed musculotendon point, the three-dimensional location was re-sampled with a uniform Latin hypercube method within the anatomical variability and the static optimization problem was then re-solved for all perturbations. We found that musculotendon point locations in the generic model showed only variable correspondences with the anatomical variability. The anatomical variability of musculotendon point location did affect the calculated muscle forces: muscles most sensitive to perturbations within the anatomical variability are iliacus and psoas. Perturbation of the gluteus medius anterior, iliacus and psoas induces the largest concomitant changes in muscle forces of the unperturbed muscles. Therefore, when creating subject-specific musculoskeletal models, these attachment points should be defined accurately. In addition, the size of the anatomical variability of the musculotendon point location was not related to the sensitivity of the calculated muscle forces.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2116-2123
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Biomechanics
Volume48
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 16 2015

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Gait
Muscle
Muscles
Geometry
Magnetic resonance
Lower Extremity
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Imaging techniques
Computer simulation

Keywords

  • Anatomical variability
  • Dynamic simulations
  • Muscle forces
  • Sensitivity analysis
  • Subject-specific musculoskeletal models

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Rehabilitation
  • Biophysics
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Bosmans, L., Valente, G., Wesseling, M., Van Campen, A., De Groote, F., De Schutter, J., & Jonkers, I. (2015). Sensitivity of predicted muscle forces during gait to anatomical variability in musculotendon geometry. Journal of Biomechanics, 48(10), 2116-2123. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jbiomech.2015.02.052

Sensitivity of predicted muscle forces during gait to anatomical variability in musculotendon geometry. / Bosmans, Lode; Valente, Giordano; Wesseling, Mariska; Van Campen, Anke; De Groote, Friedl; De Schutter, Joris; Jonkers, Ilse.

In: Journal of Biomechanics, Vol. 48, No. 10, 16.07.2015, p. 2116-2123.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bosmans, L, Valente, G, Wesseling, M, Van Campen, A, De Groote, F, De Schutter, J & Jonkers, I 2015, 'Sensitivity of predicted muscle forces during gait to anatomical variability in musculotendon geometry', Journal of Biomechanics, vol. 48, no. 10, pp. 2116-2123. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jbiomech.2015.02.052
Bosmans L, Valente G, Wesseling M, Van Campen A, De Groote F, De Schutter J et al. Sensitivity of predicted muscle forces during gait to anatomical variability in musculotendon geometry. Journal of Biomechanics. 2015 Jul 16;48(10):2116-2123. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jbiomech.2015.02.052
Bosmans, Lode ; Valente, Giordano ; Wesseling, Mariska ; Van Campen, Anke ; De Groote, Friedl ; De Schutter, Joris ; Jonkers, Ilse. / Sensitivity of predicted muscle forces during gait to anatomical variability in musculotendon geometry. In: Journal of Biomechanics. 2015 ; Vol. 48, No. 10. pp. 2116-2123.
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