Sequential neurological examinations in infants with neonatal encephalopathy and low Apgar scores: Relationship with brain MRI

D. Ricci, A. Guzzetta, F. Cowan, L. Haataja, M. Rutherford, L. Dubowitz, E. Mercuri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The aims of this study were to (a) describe the evolution of neurological signs after the neonatal period in infants with neonatal encephalopathy and abnormal outcome and (b) to establish the relationship between the evolution of neurological signs and patterns of lesions on brain MRI. Patients: Fifteen children with low Apgar scores, abnormal neurological signs at the end of the neonatal period, and abnormal outcome were examined at 1-2 weeks, 5-7 weeks, and 6 months. All the infants had at least one MRI scan performed in the neonatal period. Results: All infants had persistent abnormalities on all examinations performed but the severity of neurological impairment was variable and was related to the pattern of brain lesions. Infants with severe basal ganglia and white matter lesions showed abnormal axial and limb tone, movements, and visual function on all the examinations and none achieved independent sitting. In infants with moderate basal ganglia lesions and/or severe white matter changes, visual function and feeding improved by 5-7 weeks and were still normal at 6 months while limb tone, which was reduced in the first weeks, appeared to be normal at 5-6 weeks but was found to be increased at 6 months; all were able to sit unsupported at 2 years and most of them achieved the ability to walk with support. Conclusions: Our results suggest that the evolution of the neurological patterns after the neonatal period in infants with persisting neonatal abnormalities depends on their pattern of brain lesions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)148-153
Number of pages6
JournalNeuropediatrics
Volume37
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2006

Fingerprint

Apgar Score
Neurologic Examination
Brain Diseases
Brain
Basal Ganglia
Extremities
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Keywords

  • Brain MRI
  • Full term
  • Infant
  • Neurological

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Sequential neurological examinations in infants with neonatal encephalopathy and low Apgar scores : Relationship with brain MRI. / Ricci, D.; Guzzetta, A.; Cowan, F.; Haataja, L.; Rutherford, M.; Dubowitz, L.; Mercuri, E.

In: Neuropediatrics, Vol. 37, No. 3, 06.2006, p. 148-153.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ricci, D. ; Guzzetta, A. ; Cowan, F. ; Haataja, L. ; Rutherford, M. ; Dubowitz, L. ; Mercuri, E. / Sequential neurological examinations in infants with neonatal encephalopathy and low Apgar scores : Relationship with brain MRI. In: Neuropediatrics. 2006 ; Vol. 37, No. 3. pp. 148-153.
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