Serial high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) in children with chronic productive cough and bronchiectasis unrelated to cystic fibrosis: Correlations with clinical evaluation

M. F. Patria, M. Fusi, M. C. Pietrogrande, N. Bonelli, F. Rusconi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives. To follow prospectively for 3 years children with chronic productive cough and non-Cystic Fibrosis bronchiectasis defined by high resolution computed tomographic scanning, in order to determine the evolution of lung damage; to compare their computed tomography scores with the results obtained with a simple clinical parameter (cough index) used to monitor the disease. Methods. We studied 22 children for 3 years, during which they underwent regular physiotherapy and antibiotic therapy for acute lower respiratory tract infections. The number of months/year of productive cough (cough index) was calculated for each patient for the 2 years before study entry and during the study. At the end of follow-up, chest high resolution computed tomographic (HRCT) was repeated. Results. During follow-up the cough index improved or remained stable in 19 children (86%); among these, HRCT scores decreased in 12, remained stable in 6 and worsened in 1. Mild and moderate bronchiectasis remained unchanged in 17 patients (77%) and completely resolved in 4. There was a close correlation between the change in cough index before and during the follow-up, and the change in HRCT scores (r = 0.66; p = 0.0008). Conclusion. The cough index significantly improved and the HRCT score of most patients improved or remained unchanged during the 3 years of systematic treatment; there was a close correlation between the change in the HRCT scores and the change in the cough index used to monitor the evolution of lung damage. Patients with a persistent productive cough do not need to repeat HRCT within a short time if the clinical symptoms improve or remain stable.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)112-117
Number of pages6
JournalItalian Journal of Pediatrics
Volume32
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2006

Fingerprint

Bronchiectasis
Cough
Cystic Fibrosis
Tomography
Lung
Respiratory Tract Infections
Fibrosis
Thorax
Anti-Bacterial Agents

Keywords

  • Bronchiectasis
  • Chest
  • Chronic productive cough
  • HRCT score

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Serial high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) in children with chronic productive cough and bronchiectasis unrelated to cystic fibrosis : Correlations with clinical evaluation. / Patria, M. F.; Fusi, M.; Pietrogrande, M. C.; Bonelli, N.; Rusconi, F.

In: Italian Journal of Pediatrics, Vol. 32, No. 2, 2006, p. 112-117.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{1a37d265a51a4412a1db9f61224ddb6b,
title = "Serial high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) in children with chronic productive cough and bronchiectasis unrelated to cystic fibrosis: Correlations with clinical evaluation",
abstract = "Objectives. To follow prospectively for 3 years children with chronic productive cough and non-Cystic Fibrosis bronchiectasis defined by high resolution computed tomographic scanning, in order to determine the evolution of lung damage; to compare their computed tomography scores with the results obtained with a simple clinical parameter (cough index) used to monitor the disease. Methods. We studied 22 children for 3 years, during which they underwent regular physiotherapy and antibiotic therapy for acute lower respiratory tract infections. The number of months/year of productive cough (cough index) was calculated for each patient for the 2 years before study entry and during the study. At the end of follow-up, chest high resolution computed tomographic (HRCT) was repeated. Results. During follow-up the cough index improved or remained stable in 19 children (86{\%}); among these, HRCT scores decreased in 12, remained stable in 6 and worsened in 1. Mild and moderate bronchiectasis remained unchanged in 17 patients (77{\%}) and completely resolved in 4. There was a close correlation between the change in cough index before and during the follow-up, and the change in HRCT scores (r = 0.66; p = 0.0008). Conclusion. The cough index significantly improved and the HRCT score of most patients improved or remained unchanged during the 3 years of systematic treatment; there was a close correlation between the change in the HRCT scores and the change in the cough index used to monitor the evolution of lung damage. Patients with a persistent productive cough do not need to repeat HRCT within a short time if the clinical symptoms improve or remain stable.",
keywords = "Bronchiectasis, Chest, Chronic productive cough, HRCT score",
author = "Patria, {M. F.} and M. Fusi and Pietrogrande, {M. C.} and N. Bonelli and F. Rusconi",
year = "2006",
language = "English",
volume = "32",
pages = "112--117",
journal = "Italian Journal of Pediatrics",
issn = "1720-8424",
publisher = "BioMed Central Ltd.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Serial high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) in children with chronic productive cough and bronchiectasis unrelated to cystic fibrosis

T2 - Correlations with clinical evaluation

AU - Patria, M. F.

AU - Fusi, M.

AU - Pietrogrande, M. C.

AU - Bonelli, N.

AU - Rusconi, F.

PY - 2006

Y1 - 2006

N2 - Objectives. To follow prospectively for 3 years children with chronic productive cough and non-Cystic Fibrosis bronchiectasis defined by high resolution computed tomographic scanning, in order to determine the evolution of lung damage; to compare their computed tomography scores with the results obtained with a simple clinical parameter (cough index) used to monitor the disease. Methods. We studied 22 children for 3 years, during which they underwent regular physiotherapy and antibiotic therapy for acute lower respiratory tract infections. The number of months/year of productive cough (cough index) was calculated for each patient for the 2 years before study entry and during the study. At the end of follow-up, chest high resolution computed tomographic (HRCT) was repeated. Results. During follow-up the cough index improved or remained stable in 19 children (86%); among these, HRCT scores decreased in 12, remained stable in 6 and worsened in 1. Mild and moderate bronchiectasis remained unchanged in 17 patients (77%) and completely resolved in 4. There was a close correlation between the change in cough index before and during the follow-up, and the change in HRCT scores (r = 0.66; p = 0.0008). Conclusion. The cough index significantly improved and the HRCT score of most patients improved or remained unchanged during the 3 years of systematic treatment; there was a close correlation between the change in the HRCT scores and the change in the cough index used to monitor the evolution of lung damage. Patients with a persistent productive cough do not need to repeat HRCT within a short time if the clinical symptoms improve or remain stable.

AB - Objectives. To follow prospectively for 3 years children with chronic productive cough and non-Cystic Fibrosis bronchiectasis defined by high resolution computed tomographic scanning, in order to determine the evolution of lung damage; to compare their computed tomography scores with the results obtained with a simple clinical parameter (cough index) used to monitor the disease. Methods. We studied 22 children for 3 years, during which they underwent regular physiotherapy and antibiotic therapy for acute lower respiratory tract infections. The number of months/year of productive cough (cough index) was calculated for each patient for the 2 years before study entry and during the study. At the end of follow-up, chest high resolution computed tomographic (HRCT) was repeated. Results. During follow-up the cough index improved or remained stable in 19 children (86%); among these, HRCT scores decreased in 12, remained stable in 6 and worsened in 1. Mild and moderate bronchiectasis remained unchanged in 17 patients (77%) and completely resolved in 4. There was a close correlation between the change in cough index before and during the follow-up, and the change in HRCT scores (r = 0.66; p = 0.0008). Conclusion. The cough index significantly improved and the HRCT score of most patients improved or remained unchanged during the 3 years of systematic treatment; there was a close correlation between the change in the HRCT scores and the change in the cough index used to monitor the evolution of lung damage. Patients with a persistent productive cough do not need to repeat HRCT within a short time if the clinical symptoms improve or remain stable.

KW - Bronchiectasis

KW - Chest

KW - Chronic productive cough

KW - HRCT score

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33747048141&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33747048141&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:33747048141

VL - 32

SP - 112

EP - 117

JO - Italian Journal of Pediatrics

JF - Italian Journal of Pediatrics

SN - 1720-8424

IS - 2

ER -