Serum amyloid A, procalcitonin, and C-reactive protein in early assessment of severity of acute pancreatitis

Raffaele Pezzilli, Gian Vico Melzi D'Eril, Antonio Maria Morselli-Labate, Gianpaolo Merlini, Bahjat Barakat, Tiziana Bosoni

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Amyloid A (SAA) and procalcitonin (PCT) have been reported as useful indicators of inflammation. Our aim was to assess the utility of SAA and PCT in establishing the severity of acute pancreatitis in comparison to C- reactive protein (CRP): ~Thirty-one patients with acute pancreatitis enrolled within 24 hr from the onset of pain and 31 healthy subjects were studied. Nineteen patients had mild acute pancreatitis, and 12 had severe pancreatitis. Serum SAA, PCT, and CRP were measured in all subjects at admission and, in acute pancreatitis patients, during the following five days. ~Patients with acute pancreatitis had serum concentrations of SAA, PC~T, and CRP significantly higher (P <0.001) than those of healthy subjects during the entire study period. Using cutoff values ranging from 240 to 250 mg/liter for SAA, from 0.252 to 0.255 ng/ml for PCT, and from 12.8 to 12.9 mg/dl for CRP, the sensitivity (calculated on patients with severe pancreatitis), the specificity (calculated on patients with mild pancreatitis), and the efficiency (calculated as the percentage of correct classifications) were 76.8%, 69.3%, and 72.4% for SAA; 21.7%, 83.2%, and 58.2% for PCT; and 60.9%, 89.1%, and 77.6% for CRP. In conclusion, the sensitivity of SAA is significantly higher than that of PCT and CRP in assessing the severity of pancreatitis, whereas PCT and CRP had a specificity significantly higher than SAA. The accuracy and efficiency were similar for SAA and CRP, and both these markers had an accuracy and efficiency significantly higher than those of PCT.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1072-1078
Number of pages7
JournalDigestive Diseases and Sciences
Volume45
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2000

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Serum Amyloid A Protein
Calcitonin
Pancreatitis
C-Reactive Protein
Healthy Volunteers
Serum
Amyloid
Inflammation
Pain

Keywords

  • Acute pancreatitis
  • Amyloid A
  • C-reactive protein
  • Procalcitonin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Serum amyloid A, procalcitonin, and C-reactive protein in early assessment of severity of acute pancreatitis. / Pezzilli, Raffaele; D'Eril, Gian Vico Melzi; Morselli-Labate, Antonio Maria; Merlini, Gianpaolo; Barakat, Bahjat; Bosoni, Tiziana.

In: Digestive Diseases and Sciences, Vol. 45, No. 6, 2000, p. 1072-1078.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pezzilli, Raffaele ; D'Eril, Gian Vico Melzi ; Morselli-Labate, Antonio Maria ; Merlini, Gianpaolo ; Barakat, Bahjat ; Bosoni, Tiziana. / Serum amyloid A, procalcitonin, and C-reactive protein in early assessment of severity of acute pancreatitis. In: Digestive Diseases and Sciences. 2000 ; Vol. 45, No. 6. pp. 1072-1078.
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AU - Pezzilli, Raffaele

AU - D'Eril, Gian Vico Melzi

AU - Morselli-Labate, Antonio Maria

AU - Merlini, Gianpaolo

AU - Barakat, Bahjat

AU - Bosoni, Tiziana

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N2 - Amyloid A (SAA) and procalcitonin (PCT) have been reported as useful indicators of inflammation. Our aim was to assess the utility of SAA and PCT in establishing the severity of acute pancreatitis in comparison to C- reactive protein (CRP): ~Thirty-one patients with acute pancreatitis enrolled within 24 hr from the onset of pain and 31 healthy subjects were studied. Nineteen patients had mild acute pancreatitis, and 12 had severe pancreatitis. Serum SAA, PCT, and CRP were measured in all subjects at admission and, in acute pancreatitis patients, during the following five days. ~Patients with acute pancreatitis had serum concentrations of SAA, PC~T, and CRP significantly higher (P <0.001) than those of healthy subjects during the entire study period. Using cutoff values ranging from 240 to 250 mg/liter for SAA, from 0.252 to 0.255 ng/ml for PCT, and from 12.8 to 12.9 mg/dl for CRP, the sensitivity (calculated on patients with severe pancreatitis), the specificity (calculated on patients with mild pancreatitis), and the efficiency (calculated as the percentage of correct classifications) were 76.8%, 69.3%, and 72.4% for SAA; 21.7%, 83.2%, and 58.2% for PCT; and 60.9%, 89.1%, and 77.6% for CRP. In conclusion, the sensitivity of SAA is significantly higher than that of PCT and CRP in assessing the severity of pancreatitis, whereas PCT and CRP had a specificity significantly higher than SAA. The accuracy and efficiency were similar for SAA and CRP, and both these markers had an accuracy and efficiency significantly higher than those of PCT.

AB - Amyloid A (SAA) and procalcitonin (PCT) have been reported as useful indicators of inflammation. Our aim was to assess the utility of SAA and PCT in establishing the severity of acute pancreatitis in comparison to C- reactive protein (CRP): ~Thirty-one patients with acute pancreatitis enrolled within 24 hr from the onset of pain and 31 healthy subjects were studied. Nineteen patients had mild acute pancreatitis, and 12 had severe pancreatitis. Serum SAA, PCT, and CRP were measured in all subjects at admission and, in acute pancreatitis patients, during the following five days. ~Patients with acute pancreatitis had serum concentrations of SAA, PC~T, and CRP significantly higher (P <0.001) than those of healthy subjects during the entire study period. Using cutoff values ranging from 240 to 250 mg/liter for SAA, from 0.252 to 0.255 ng/ml for PCT, and from 12.8 to 12.9 mg/dl for CRP, the sensitivity (calculated on patients with severe pancreatitis), the specificity (calculated on patients with mild pancreatitis), and the efficiency (calculated as the percentage of correct classifications) were 76.8%, 69.3%, and 72.4% for SAA; 21.7%, 83.2%, and 58.2% for PCT; and 60.9%, 89.1%, and 77.6% for CRP. In conclusion, the sensitivity of SAA is significantly higher than that of PCT and CRP in assessing the severity of pancreatitis, whereas PCT and CRP had a specificity significantly higher than SAA. The accuracy and efficiency were similar for SAA and CRP, and both these markers had an accuracy and efficiency significantly higher than those of PCT.

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KW - C-reactive protein

KW - Procalcitonin

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