Serum iron and matrix metalloproteinase-9 variations in limbs affected by chronic venous disease and venous leg ulcers

Paolo Zamboni, Gianluigi Scapoli, Vincenzo Lanzara, Marcello Izzo, Patrizia Fortini, Andrea Legnaro, Annunziata Palazzo, Silvia Tognazzo, Donato Gemmati

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND. Severe chronic venous disease (CVD) is characterized by both dermal hemosiderin accumulation and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) hyperactivation. The iron-driven pathway is one of the recognized mechanisms of MMP hyperactivation. OBJECTIVE. To investigate the potential consequences of leg hemosiderin deposits on both iron metabolism and activation of MMPs. METHODS. We contemporaneously assessed the following in the serum of the arm and ankle veins of 30 patients (C4-6) with CVD and 14 normal subjects: ferritin, transferrin, iron, percentage of transferrin iron binding capacity (%TIBC), and MMP-9. Optical microscopy examinations with Perls' staining of chronic wounds were also performed. RESULTS. Histology consistently revealed iron deposits. Serum ferritin, iron, and %TIBC were significantly increased in the legs affected by severe CVD compared with the arm of the same subjects or the controls. In addition, iron and %TIBC were significantly elevated in the legs of ulcer patients. The rate of activation of MMP-9 was significantly elevated in CVD. CONCLUSIONS. The increased iron deposition in legs affected by CVD seems to be more instable in ulcer patients, leading to iron release in the serum of the affected leg. Our data suggest the iron-driven pathway as a further mechanism for MMP hyperexpression leading to tissue lesion.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)644-649
Number of pages6
JournalDermatologic Surgery
Volume31
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - 2005

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Surgery

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