Serum leptin and CD4+ T lymphocytes in HIV+ children during highly active antiretroviral therapy

G. Matarese, G. Castelli-Gattinara, C. Cancrini, S. Bernardi, M. L. Romiti, C. Savarese, A. Di Giacomo, P. Rossi, L. Racioppi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Because leptin, the adipocyte-derived hormone, affects thymocyte survival, proliferation of naïve T lymphocytes and the production of proinflammatory cytokines, we aimed to investigate the role of this molecule in immunoreconstitution during highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). DESIGN: Prospective longitudinal cohort study. A series of 20 HIV+ children were studied. The subjects were grouped by their increase in serum leptin levels after HAART. METHODS: All participants were weight-stable, free of endocrine disorders and opportunistic infections and equally distributed for sex (males, n = 10; females, n = 10). Body mass index (BMI), serum lipids, leptin, CD4+ T cells and HIV-1 RNA were measured before initiation of HAART and after a 2-year follow-up. RESULTS: Serum leptin concentration positively correlated with CD4+ lymphocyte number before treatment. HAART significantly reduced viraemia and increased serum levels of lipids in all patients, whereas a significant increase in CD4+ cells and serum leptin was observed in the majority of patients. Notably, in children where HAART was not effective in increasing CD4+ lymphocyte counts, serum leptin did not increase. CONCLUSION: To our knowledge, these findings reveal for the first time a novel link among CD4+ T lymphocytes, serum leptin and highly active anteretroviral theraphy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)643-646
Number of pages4
JournalClinical Endocrinology
Volume57
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology

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