Serum thymus and activation-regulated chemokine level monitoring may predict disease relapse detected by pet scan after reduced-intensity allogeneic stem cell transplantation in patients with hodgkin lymphoma

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Abstract

Patients with relapsed and refractory Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) may experience long-term survival after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT), but disease recurrence represents the main cause of treatment failure. Positron-emission tomography (PET)-positive patients after alloSCT have a dismal outcome. Serum thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC) is produced by Reed-Sternberg cells and may be a marker of disease. Our study aimed at assessing whether TARC levels after alloSCT correlated with disease status and whether TARC monitoring could increase the ability to predict relapse. Twenty-four patients were evaluated in a prospective observational study. TARC serum level and PET were assessed before and after alloSCT during the follow-up (median, 30 months; range, 2 to 54). Before alloSCT, the median TARC level was 721 pg/mL (range, 209 to 1332) in PET-negative patients and 2542 pg/mL (range, 94 to 13,870) in PET-positive patients. After alloSCT, TARC was 620 pg/mL (range, 12 to 4333) in persistently PET-negative patients compared with 22,397 pg/mL (range, 602 to 106,578) in PET-positive patients (. P <.0001). In 7 patients who relapsed after alloSCT, TARC level increased progressively even before PET became positive, with a median fold increase of 3.19 (range, 1.66 to 7.11) at relapse. The cut-off value of 1726 pg/mL had a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 71% for PET positivity. Patients with at least 1 TARC value above 1726 pg/mL during the first year after alloSCT had a worse progression-free survival (. P= .031). In conclusion, TARC was correlated with disease status and its monitoring may be able to predict PET positivity after alloSCT, thus potentially allowing an early immune manipulation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1982-1988
Number of pages7
JournalBiology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation
Volume20
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2014

Fingerprint

Chemokine CCL17
Pets
Stem Cell Transplantation
Hodgkin Disease
Positron-Emission Tomography
Recurrence
Serum
Reed-Sternberg Cells
Treatment Failure
Disease-Free Survival
Observational Studies
Prospective Studies

Keywords

  • Allogeneic stem cell transplantation
  • Hodgkin lymphoma
  • Thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transplantation
  • Hematology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

@article{2c0c14178ad54a06994aeafc7411cf12,
title = "Serum thymus and activation-regulated chemokine level monitoring may predict disease relapse detected by pet scan after reduced-intensity allogeneic stem cell transplantation in patients with hodgkin lymphoma",
abstract = "Patients with relapsed and refractory Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) may experience long-term survival after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT), but disease recurrence represents the main cause of treatment failure. Positron-emission tomography (PET)-positive patients after alloSCT have a dismal outcome. Serum thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC) is produced by Reed-Sternberg cells and may be a marker of disease. Our study aimed at assessing whether TARC levels after alloSCT correlated with disease status and whether TARC monitoring could increase the ability to predict relapse. Twenty-four patients were evaluated in a prospective observational study. TARC serum level and PET were assessed before and after alloSCT during the follow-up (median, 30 months; range, 2 to 54). Before alloSCT, the median TARC level was 721 pg/mL (range, 209 to 1332) in PET-negative patients and 2542 pg/mL (range, 94 to 13,870) in PET-positive patients. After alloSCT, TARC was 620 pg/mL (range, 12 to 4333) in persistently PET-negative patients compared with 22,397 pg/mL (range, 602 to 106,578) in PET-positive patients (. P <.0001). In 7 patients who relapsed after alloSCT, TARC level increased progressively even before PET became positive, with a median fold increase of 3.19 (range, 1.66 to 7.11) at relapse. The cut-off value of 1726 pg/mL had a sensitivity of 100{\%} and a specificity of 71{\%} for PET positivity. Patients with at least 1 TARC value above 1726 pg/mL during the first year after alloSCT had a worse progression-free survival (. P= .031). In conclusion, TARC was correlated with disease status and its monitoring may be able to predict PET positivity after alloSCT, thus potentially allowing an early immune manipulation.",
keywords = "Allogeneic stem cell transplantation, Hodgkin lymphoma, Thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC)",
author = "Lucia Farina and Francesca Rezzonico and Francesco Spina and Anna Dodero and Arabella Mazzocchi and Flavio Crippa and Alessandra Alessi and Serena Dalto and Simonetta Viviani and Paolo Corradini",
year = "2014",
month = "12",
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language = "English",
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pages = "1982--1988",
journal = "Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation",
issn = "1083-8791",
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T1 - Serum thymus and activation-regulated chemokine level monitoring may predict disease relapse detected by pet scan after reduced-intensity allogeneic stem cell transplantation in patients with hodgkin lymphoma

AU - Farina, Lucia

AU - Rezzonico, Francesca

AU - Spina, Francesco

AU - Dodero, Anna

AU - Mazzocchi, Arabella

AU - Crippa, Flavio

AU - Alessi, Alessandra

AU - Dalto, Serena

AU - Viviani, Simonetta

AU - Corradini, Paolo

PY - 2014/12/1

Y1 - 2014/12/1

N2 - Patients with relapsed and refractory Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) may experience long-term survival after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT), but disease recurrence represents the main cause of treatment failure. Positron-emission tomography (PET)-positive patients after alloSCT have a dismal outcome. Serum thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC) is produced by Reed-Sternberg cells and may be a marker of disease. Our study aimed at assessing whether TARC levels after alloSCT correlated with disease status and whether TARC monitoring could increase the ability to predict relapse. Twenty-four patients were evaluated in a prospective observational study. TARC serum level and PET were assessed before and after alloSCT during the follow-up (median, 30 months; range, 2 to 54). Before alloSCT, the median TARC level was 721 pg/mL (range, 209 to 1332) in PET-negative patients and 2542 pg/mL (range, 94 to 13,870) in PET-positive patients. After alloSCT, TARC was 620 pg/mL (range, 12 to 4333) in persistently PET-negative patients compared with 22,397 pg/mL (range, 602 to 106,578) in PET-positive patients (. P <.0001). In 7 patients who relapsed after alloSCT, TARC level increased progressively even before PET became positive, with a median fold increase of 3.19 (range, 1.66 to 7.11) at relapse. The cut-off value of 1726 pg/mL had a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 71% for PET positivity. Patients with at least 1 TARC value above 1726 pg/mL during the first year after alloSCT had a worse progression-free survival (. P= .031). In conclusion, TARC was correlated with disease status and its monitoring may be able to predict PET positivity after alloSCT, thus potentially allowing an early immune manipulation.

AB - Patients with relapsed and refractory Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) may experience long-term survival after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT), but disease recurrence represents the main cause of treatment failure. Positron-emission tomography (PET)-positive patients after alloSCT have a dismal outcome. Serum thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC) is produced by Reed-Sternberg cells and may be a marker of disease. Our study aimed at assessing whether TARC levels after alloSCT correlated with disease status and whether TARC monitoring could increase the ability to predict relapse. Twenty-four patients were evaluated in a prospective observational study. TARC serum level and PET were assessed before and after alloSCT during the follow-up (median, 30 months; range, 2 to 54). Before alloSCT, the median TARC level was 721 pg/mL (range, 209 to 1332) in PET-negative patients and 2542 pg/mL (range, 94 to 13,870) in PET-positive patients. After alloSCT, TARC was 620 pg/mL (range, 12 to 4333) in persistently PET-negative patients compared with 22,397 pg/mL (range, 602 to 106,578) in PET-positive patients (. P <.0001). In 7 patients who relapsed after alloSCT, TARC level increased progressively even before PET became positive, with a median fold increase of 3.19 (range, 1.66 to 7.11) at relapse. The cut-off value of 1726 pg/mL had a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 71% for PET positivity. Patients with at least 1 TARC value above 1726 pg/mL during the first year after alloSCT had a worse progression-free survival (. P= .031). In conclusion, TARC was correlated with disease status and its monitoring may be able to predict PET positivity after alloSCT, thus potentially allowing an early immune manipulation.

KW - Allogeneic stem cell transplantation

KW - Hodgkin lymphoma

KW - Thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC)

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