Setting the stage: An anatomist's view of the immune system

Enrico Crivellato, Angelo Vacca, Domenico Ribatti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Anatomical strategies that help cells to interact greatly increase the efficiency of the adaptive immune system. In vivo, antigens are presented in a complex environment, wherein their movements and those of antigen-presenting cells, T cells and B cells are subject to anatomical constraints. Specialized subcompartments appear to facilitate cell-to-cell contact and recognition and provide the most favorable milieu for signaling and induction mechanisms. How does the overall organization of a lymphoid organ facilitate the initiation and regulation of adaptive immune responses? This Review offers some answers to this basic question and focuses on the latest advances in our understanding of the functional anatomy of the lymph nodes, spleen and thymus.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)210-217
Number of pages8
JournalTrends in Immunology
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2004

Fingerprint

Anatomists
Immune System
Adaptive Immunity
Antigen-Presenting Cells
Thymus Gland
Anatomy
B-Lymphocytes
Spleen
Lymph Nodes
T-Lymphocytes
Antigens

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

Setting the stage : An anatomist's view of the immune system. / Crivellato, Enrico; Vacca, Angelo; Ribatti, Domenico.

In: Trends in Immunology, Vol. 25, No. 4, 04.2004, p. 210-217.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Crivellato, Enrico ; Vacca, Angelo ; Ribatti, Domenico. / Setting the stage : An anatomist's view of the immune system. In: Trends in Immunology. 2004 ; Vol. 25, No. 4. pp. 210-217.
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