Severe acquired brain injury aetiologies, early clinical factors, and rehabilitation outcomes: a retrospective study on pediatric patients in rehabilitation

Marco Pozzi, Sara Galbiati, Federica Locatelli, Carla Carnovale, Marta Gentili, Sonia Radice, Sandra Strazzer, Emilio Clementi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Studies on pediatric severe acquired brain injury (sABI) outcomes focused mostly on single etiologies, not clarifying the independent role of clinical factors, and scantly explored inter-dependence between variables. We assessed associations of clinical factors at admission with essential outcomes, controlling for inter-dependence and sABI etiology. Methods: We reviewed the clinical records of 280 patients with traumatic and 292 with non-traumatic sABI, discharged from intensive care to pediatric neurological rehabilitation. We analyzed the distribution of clinical factors based on sABI etiology; conducted a factor analysis of variables; built multivariate models evaluating the associations of variables with death, persistent vegetative states, duration of coma, GOS outcome, length of stay. Results: We described the study sample. Factor analysis of inter-dependence between GCS, time before rehabilitation, dysautonomia, device use, produced the indicators “injury severity” and “neurological dysfunction”, independent from sABI etiology, age, sex, and admittance GOS. Multivariate analyzes showed that: coma duration, GOS outcome, and length of stay, which may depend on rehabilitation courses, were directly associated with injury severity, neurological dysfunction, and patients’ age; death and persistent vegetative states were also associated with etiology. Conclusion: Future studies should analyze larger cohorts and investigate mechanisms linking specific etiologies and patients’ age with outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1522-1528
Number of pages7
JournalBrain Injury
Volume33
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Brain Injuries
Rehabilitation
Retrospective Studies
Pediatrics
Persistent Vegetative State
Coma
Statistical Factor Analysis
Length of Stay
Primary Dysautonomias
Hospital Distribution Systems
Wounds and Injuries
Critical Care
Cohort Studies
Multivariate Analysis
Equipment and Supplies

Keywords

  • Brain injury
  • outcomes
  • Pediatrics
  • rehabilitation
  • risk factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience (miscellaneous)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Severe acquired brain injury aetiologies, early clinical factors, and rehabilitation outcomes : a retrospective study on pediatric patients in rehabilitation. / Pozzi, Marco; Galbiati, Sara; Locatelli, Federica; Carnovale, Carla; Gentili, Marta; Radice, Sonia; Strazzer, Sandra; Clementi, Emilio.

In: Brain Injury, Vol. 33, No. 12, 01.01.2019, p. 1522-1528.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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