Sex hormones modulate brain damage in multiple sclerosis

MRI evidence

V. Tomassini, E. Onesti, C. Mainero, E. Giugni, A. Paolillo, M. Salvetti, F. Nicoletti, Carlo Pozzilli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

92 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Sex related differences in the course and severity of multiple sclerosis (MS) could be mediated by the sex hormones. Objective: To investigate the relation between serum sex hormone concentrations and characteristics of tissue damage on conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in men and women suffering from relapsing-remitting MS. Results: Serum testosterone was significantly lower in women with MS than in controls. The lowest levels were found in women with a greater number of gadolinium enhancing lesions. A positive correlation was observed between testosterone concentrations and both tissue damage on MRI and clinical disability. In men, there was a positive correlation between oestradiol concentrations and brain damage. Conclusions: The hormone related modulation of pathological changes supports the hypothesis that sex hormones play a role in the inflammation, damage, and repair mechanisms typical of MS.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)272-275
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry
Volume76
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2005

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Gonadal Steroid Hormones
Multiple Sclerosis
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Sex Characteristics
Testosterone
Brain
Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis
Gadolinium
Serum
Estradiol
Hormones
Inflammation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

Cite this

Tomassini, V., Onesti, E., Mainero, C., Giugni, E., Paolillo, A., Salvetti, M., ... Pozzilli, C. (2005). Sex hormones modulate brain damage in multiple sclerosis: MRI evidence. Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, 76(2), 272-275. https://doi.org/10.1136/jnnp.2003.033324

Sex hormones modulate brain damage in multiple sclerosis : MRI evidence. / Tomassini, V.; Onesti, E.; Mainero, C.; Giugni, E.; Paolillo, A.; Salvetti, M.; Nicoletti, F.; Pozzilli, Carlo.

In: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, Vol. 76, No. 2, 02.2005, p. 272-275.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tomassini, V, Onesti, E, Mainero, C, Giugni, E, Paolillo, A, Salvetti, M, Nicoletti, F & Pozzilli, C 2005, 'Sex hormones modulate brain damage in multiple sclerosis: MRI evidence', Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, vol. 76, no. 2, pp. 272-275. https://doi.org/10.1136/jnnp.2003.033324
Tomassini, V. ; Onesti, E. ; Mainero, C. ; Giugni, E. ; Paolillo, A. ; Salvetti, M. ; Nicoletti, F. ; Pozzilli, Carlo. / Sex hormones modulate brain damage in multiple sclerosis : MRI evidence. In: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry. 2005 ; Vol. 76, No. 2. pp. 272-275.
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