SHLA-I contamination, a novel mechanism to explain Ex Vivo/In vitro modulation of IL-10 synthesis and release in CD8+ T lymphocytes and in neutrophils following intravenous immunoglobulin infusion

Massimo Ghio, Paola Contini, Maurizio Setti, Gianluca Ubezio, Clemente Mazzei, Gino Tripodi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Numerous mechanisms have been proposed to explain the beneficial action of intravenous immune globulin (IVIG) in autoimmune and systemic inflammatory disorders; among others, they could decrease pro-inflammatory cytokine levels and also induce anti-inflammatory cytokines. Materials and Methods: Ex vivo analysis of cells from ten IVIG recipients showed significant increase of IL-10 mRNA and intra-cellular IL-10 molecules in both leukotypes. Results: In vitro comparable results were obtained incubating CD8+ T lymphocytes and neutrophils from healthy donors with IVIG. sHLA-I and/or sFasL immunodepletion abolished IL-10 modulation. Co-culture with contaminant-free IgM or MabThera did not exert any mRNA modulation. Finally, IgM or MabThera plus purified sHLA-I molecules enhanced IL-10-mRNA in both leukotypes to levels comparable to those obtained with IVIG incubation. Conclusion: As IVIG infusion involves administration of soluble contaminants, these data consent to speculate that IVIG might modulate IL-10 via the immunomodulatory activities of sHLA-I contaminant molecules inducing transcriptional and post-transcriptional modulation of IL-10 in CD8+ T lymphocytes and neutrophils.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)384-392
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Clinical Immunology
Volume30
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2010

Keywords

  • IL-10
  • Immunomodulation
  • IVIG
  • SHLA-I

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Medicine(all)

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