Shock wave therapy as an innovative technology in skeletal disorder: Study on transmembrane current in stimulated osteoblast-like cells

L. Martini, G. Giavaresi, M. Fini, P. Torricelli, V. Borsari, Roberto Giardino, M. De Pretto, D. Remondini, G. C. Castellani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Extracorporeal shock wave treatment (ESWT) is successfully used in various musculoskeletal disorders and pathologies. Despite the increasing use of this kind of therapy, some aspects of its mechanism of action are still unclear. In vitro bone cell behavior under ESWT were previously investigated by the present author and MG63 osteoblast-like cells showed an enhancement in proliferation and in the osteoblast differentiation after therapy with a low-energy flux density. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of ESWT on the permeabilization of cell membrane. We characterized physiological changes in the MG63 associated with ESWT generated by an ESW device and patch clamp recording was performed to study ion channels. Experiments were carried out using the whole-cell recording configuration of the patch-clamp technique and the ionic current measurements were performed on cell samples of ESW treated and control groups. The patch-clamp technique showed the effect of ESWT on the amplitude of transmembrane currents. The treatment with ESW enhanced the transmembrane current as well the voltage dependence of Ca-activated and K channels that mediate these currents: the differences between treated cells and control at 80mV were over 1000 pA (p

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)841-847
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Artificial Organs
Volume28
Issue number8
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2005

Keywords

  • Ion channels
  • Osteoblasts
  • Patch-clamp
  • Shock waves

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics

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